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Dental Supplies
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IPS e.max Smile Award 2016: Last call for case submission

Held for the first time, the worldwide competition will recognise extraordinary aesthetic and dental restoration cases that use the IPS e.max System. After the February…

Held for the first time, the worldwide competition will recognise extraordinary aesthetic and dental restoration cases that use the IPS e.max System. After the February closing date, a panel of industry experts will evaluate the entries based on aesthetics, complexity and harmony.

As aesthetic perception varies between continents and regions, there will be several winners, the organisers said. The best three teams of dentists and dental technicians from Europe, the Middle East and Africa; North America and Oceania; Latin America; and Asia will be presented on 10 June, on the eve of Ivoclar Vivadent’s International Expert Symposium in Madrid in Spain.

According to the company, the winners’ submissions will be presented to a broad public through social media, at trade shows and other events, and in professional journals.

Cases should be documented in detail using photographs and videos and can be submitted online at ipsemax.com/smileaward. After signing in, participants will receive the login details for their individual account.

Introduced to dental markets over a decade ago, the IPS e.max System has become one of the world’s most popular and successful all-ceramic systems, covering a wide range of indications, from thin veneers used in single-tooth restorations to crowns and wide-span bridges. It is currently available in lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide and can be used for the press technique and CAD/CAM. According to Ivoclar Vivadent, IPS e.max is supported by a decade of clinical studies and more than 100 million restorations performed with the system.

Thus far, about 250 participants from all five continents have entered the competition for the IPS e.max Smile Award 2016, the organisers said. (Photograph: Ivoclar Vivadent)

February 11, 2016 11:39 am
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ICOI World Congress heads to Barcelona

More than 20 international speakers, including Prof. Hugo De Bruyn (Belgium), Dr Scott Ganz (US), Prof. Irena Sailer (Switzerland) and Dr Marius Steigmann (Germany), will…

More than 20 international speakers, including Prof. Hugo De Bruyn (Belgium), Dr Scott Ganz (US), Prof. Irena Sailer (Switzerland) and Dr Marius Steigmann (Germany), will provide attendees with the latest information on the rehabilitation of patients with tooth loss. During the main scientific programme, which starts on 31 March at 3 p.m., the lecturers will discuss the advances in conventional and digital diagnosis and implant site development for implant long-term stability, the biology of bone grafts, and the importance and the management of hard- and soft-tissue regeneration in atrophic environments. In addition, presentations will cover tissue management after tooth extraction before implant treatment, the long-term success of immediately loaded implants placed in different types of bone, and peri-implantitis as one of the major challenges in implant dentistry.

Prior to the main session, delegates will have the opportunity to attend pre-congress courses presented by sponsors Bio Horizons and Sunstar GUIDOR from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Several poster presentations and table clinics will be held on the opening day of the congress too. The awards ceremony and the subsequent gala dinner on the evening of 1 April form part of the social programme.

The congress exhibition will run from 8 a.m. on 31 March to 3.30 p.m. on 2 April. The organisers have urged companies interested in exhibiting at the congress to book their booths very soon, as the space has rapidly sold out in the past.

The ICOI, which has over 13,000 members worldwide, is an ADA CERP-recognised provider. The scientific programme for this year’s event offers up to 21 continuing education credits.

The congress in Barcelona is being organised in collaboration with the ICOI’s local affiliate, the Sociedad Española de Implantes, the Spanish society of oral implantologists. It will be held at the Barcelona International Convention Centre. Registration for the event is open at www.icoibarcelona2016.org.

The Sagrada Familia is one of the most famous monuments of Barcelona. The towers and most of the church's structure are to be completed in 2026. (Photograph: Xiong Wei/Shutterstock)

February 7, 2016 11:00 pm
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People advised not to get panicky about Zika virus

They were speaking at an awareness session on “Zika virus and vector born diseases” held here under the auspices of Directorate of Health Services, Karachi,…

They were speaking at an awareness session on “Zika virus and vector born diseases” held here under the auspices of Directorate of Health Services, Karachi, at Civic Centre.

The session was addressed, among others, by Prof Dr Shahana Urooj Kazmi, Dr Farhana Azeem and Dr Masood Solangi.

Speaking on the occasion, the Director Health Services Dr Zafar Ejaz said although the Zika virus has not been detected in Pakistan, still there is a need to create awareness about it among people.

He was of the view that there was no need to get panicky about the disease.

He directed the healthcare providers to create awareness about Zika virus and its effects on pregnant women in the city’s public sector hospitals.

Manager Dengue Prevention and Control Prorgramm, Sindh, Dr Masood Solangi said that though Zika virus was first detected in 1950 in America, still there is no vaccine to prevent Zika virus or medicine to treat its infection.

He explained that out of five infected people, the symptoms of Zika virus appear only in one person while these signs and symptoms disappear within a week itself.

He further explained that infection, known as Zika fever is similar to dengue fever, but its intensity remains low as against dengue fever.

He, however, did not rule out the possibility of Zika virus in Sindh, particularly in Karachi as dengue vector can play role of host in its spread.

He advised the public to keep their food items and water properly covered at homes and workplace. He said stagnant water must not be allowed to accumulate in any part of the city and citizens should adopt preventative measures to prevent from the virus.

Prominent gynecologist Dr Farhana Azeem discussed in detail the symptoms of catching Zika virus and its effects on pregnant women.

Prof Dr Shahana Urooj Kazmi said outbreak of Zika virus was reported from South and Central America. She said Brazil has reported most of the cases in the outbreak, so far.

The Zika virus is drawing attention because of an alarming connection between the virus and microcephaly, a neurological disorder in which babies are born with abnormally small heads, besides it causes severe developmental issues and even death in some cases.

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February 17, 2016 7:10 am
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Interview with leaders in Damon System usage

During the interviews, the doctors shared what they would like the delegates to remember from their lectures and also how much the treatments methods have…

During the interviews, the doctors shared what they would like the delegates to remember from their lectures and also how much the treatments methods have changed over the years. Additionally, they shared with us their best career advice they have ever received.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: Could you tell me a little about your lecture? What was the main objective you would like the delegates to remember?
Dr. Stuart Frost, USA: I think, I wanted the participants to understand that before they ever put the bracket on the tooth they need to visualize in their mind what they want the case to look like in the end. So I shared with them the quote from Hellen Keller where she said that “The only thing worse than being blind is having sights but no vision”. It is all about vision and visualizing the case.
Dr. Jeff Kozlowski, USA: During the lecture, I was trying to give practical ideas on how to look at things. I find that sometimes it is hard to make specific rules because every patient is different. One of the main things that we teach with Insignia is about customizing your treatment for each individual patient. What I want people to take away with them is that it is very important to think what specifically you want to accomplish for that individual patient and how you can use your mechanics to make it effective. Simply, be creative and think about good treatment planning and mechanics.
Dr. Philippe Van Steenberghe, Belgium: I wanted to tell delegates that they absolutely need to use elastics as it is part of the magic of the Damon System. The Damon System without the elastics doesn’t work the same way. For the patient it is the winning option because the treatments are faster, a lot easier and the patient can see a rapid progress.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: Your focus is strictly orthodontics. Do you think that the treatment methods have changed a lot over the years?
Dr. Stuart Frost, USA: I have graduated from dental school in 1992, I practiced dentistry for 5 years and then after that I became an orthodontist. So I have been orthodontists since 2000 and in 15 years we have seen a lot of changes in orthodontics, new technologies, new brackets and wires that make it more comfortable for the patients and treatment is more simple.
Dr. Jeff Kozlowski, USA: It would be wrong of me to say that what we learn in our residencies didn’t play a part in how I practice today, because it does, but I am very conscious when I hear orthodontists say “That’s how I was trained during my residencies” when they have been in the practice for 20 years. So, I think it is wrong to forget what you have learned, but I also think it is wrong to not to learn what is new and what is changed. So here are some things that have changed: I don’t use bands on posterior teeth anymore, it is more comfortable for the patient. I will almost always place the upper and the lower braces at the same time when I used to start with the upper braces and months later with the lower braces. It is easier for the patient and also fewer appointments. The use of disarticulations and elastics has helped us to treat the problems that used to take us lots of time in less time. I think the orthodontics has changed a lot, I also think there are orthodontists that haven’t changed with the profession and that some programs, training programs haven’t done a good enough job of changing as the profession has changed. In my opinion the good orthodontist would do a combination of remembering what they have learned at school with learning new things.
Dr. Philippe Van Steenberghe, Belgium: Yes, the objectives are really not the same, the profession itself became richer. We can obtain everything, we have to learn to do it.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: What is usually your audience at such events, are the delegates older or younger? Does it influences your presentation?
Dr. Stuart Frost, USA: I try to find out from whoever is putting on the course what the audience is. Many times the audience is a mix of older dentists or orthodontists that has been treating cases for 30 years and all the way down to residents that are still at school. I want to know all that before the lecture so I can be able to talk to all ages of orthodontists and help to apply it to them.
Dr. Jeff Kozlowski, USA: I try to teach from my mistakes, I have learned from my own mistakes. I look how I have done the case, there are no bad mistakes just things that you could have done better, could have done differently. So I try to expose those when I present, it helps the audience to see the thought process instead of saying “oh that’s how he did it”, it should be: ”that’s how he did it but this is how he could have done it or this is how we could have made it better”. That’s gives them discovery you had from learning from your mistakes. It shortens their time to learn it because they hear about the mistake before they make it. Maybe the mistake is a wrong word, different approach would be better.
Dr. Philippe Van Steenberghe, Belgium: I always do the same when the audience is mixed. I come back to the basics like definitions, calculation and then from theory and slowly to practical. It is like seeing the movie, first time when you see the story and the second time you put more attention of the roles of the actors and during the third time you see more details. What I mean is that in different presentation people will be attracted by different parts.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: What is the best career advice you have ever received and would like to share with your colleagues?
Dr. Stuart Frost, USA: I think the best career advice I can share are 3 things. You need to know who you are as a person and then know what kind of practice you want to have and then set goals and where you want to be in five years. I think all that helps us to have a good practice.
Dr. Jeff Kozlowski, USA: My career advice in the orthodontics is this: You can do and be whatever you want to be. If you don’t like orthodontics then do something else. If you love orthodontics and want to do more of it then do more of it. Find the way to have more patients to come to your office. If you want to open an office and work one day a week, you can do it. You can open one day a week, to have two staff members you can take six days off a week and you probably could make enough money to survive and be happy and travel. My career advice is, it is not only for the orthodontists, you can be whoever you want to be and it doesn’t matter where you are in your career, you can decide what really makes you happy.
Dr. Philippe Van Steenberghe, Belgium: To take time to learn the basics and not directly to go to digital orthodontics. It works the same as when learning piano or dance.

From the left: Dr. Stuart Frost, USA, DR. Jeff Kozlowski, USA, Dr. Philippe Van Steenberghe, Belgium

February 20, 2016 11:00 pm
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Mirror mirror on the wall who has the whitest teeth of all…

The basic need for clean teeth has evolved into clean and white teeth. Supporting the macro health and beauty trends, consumers want to live better…

The basic need for clean teeth has evolved into clean and white teeth. Supporting the macro health and beauty trends, consumers want to live better lives that also last longer. Yellow teeth are associated with poor personal hygiene and are also considered a sign of aging.

As we age our teeth naturally become yellower. The outer layer of our enamel gradually breaks down, exposing the under-layer, called dentin, which is naturally yellower than enamel. We can take care of our enamel by brushing with a soft toothbrush, not brushing too hard, and using a toothpaste that is also gentle and kind to our enamel.

Consumers are increasingly aware of stains that build up on their teeth by their diet. How much diet influences teeth stains, differs from market to market, but there is a general awareness around some of the main products that contribute to daily stain build-up.

The trend in Norway is that more and more patients are asking their dentists for help when it comes to whitening. Whitening treatments at the dentist are by far the best choice. Not only are they safer, they are also tailor-made to the patient’s mouth. Prior to treatment, a check-up will ensure there are no undetected cavities. If there are, these should be filled, prior to whitening applications. The treatments are, as a rule, more effective and quicker. It is important that the patients are informed that these will not work on crowns, fillings, caps or veneers. To ensure a good and lasting result it is also important to help them find the most effective routine for maintaining their new white(r) smile. Help your patients keep daily surface stains, sometimes referred to as extrinsic stains, in check.

Most dentists already recommend a soft toothbrush and are positive to gentler formulated whitening toothpastes (most commercial whitening toothpastes contain some level of silica to lift plaque and tartar during daily brushing sessions). There are also several toothbrushes that have specialized bristles that effectively lift stains.

The number one recommendation from dentists is to encourage their patients to floss once a day. Flossing before brushing will remove food particles and plaque between the teeth (where 30% of cavities start) and leave this space clean and receptive to fluoride treatment from the toothpaste. Using a straw could also be recommended if the patient has a high intake of caffeinated drinks like coffee, tea, juices or carbonated drinks. Tobacco intake is also one of the worst offenders when it comes to staining teeth. Patients might experience some sensitivity post treatment, so it is also important to advise them on what to do should this happen to them.

Deeper stains, or intrinsic stains, are more difficult to remove. These can be caused by a past injury, use of certain medications and antibiotics and grey or dull teeth can also be hereditary. Teeth bleaching, using either a hydrogen or carbonite peroxide will help break up these deeper stains into smaller, less colored pieces that will make the teeth appear brighter and whiter.

Consumers try whitening products because they want white(r) teeth². Many consumers are skeptical to the working power of whitening products. However, they buy them anyway as they feel they have nothing to lose². A whitening toothpaste gives them all the other benefits they need, for example, cavity protection and fresh breath, and on top of that they also get any whitening advantages that they might have missed out on if they choose a product without whitening claims. 27% of all toothpastes launched globally are whitening toothpastes. In comparison only 10% of toothbrush launches are³. These numbers are expected to keep growing, in line with an escalating trend of consumers wanting nice looking white teeth.

References
1. www. ADA.org
2. Needscope, Norway and Sweden 2014
3. Mintel rapport, 2014
4. Nordental dentists & Hygienists survey, 2014  

The American Dental Association asked consumers what would they most like to improve about their smile, and the reply was whiter teeth .

Survey: One in three nervous about seeing the dentist

“Despite considerable advancements in preventative care and technology, making dentistry easier and more comfortable than ever before, patients still have real concerns about dental visits,”…

“Despite considerable advancements in preventative care and technology, making dentistry easier and more comfortable than ever before, patients still have real concerns about dental visits,” said OPT-In Dental Advantage Founder and President Dr. Dean Mersky. “We as dentists have a responsibility to address those concerns. We need to bridge the gap between truth and fiction to create trust between dentists and patients. That’s why OPT-In is launching a dental education campaign, Speaking The Tooth, focused on dispelling patients’ fears by sharing free and accessible information about everything from the reality of how dental insurance works to what to ask your dentist at every check-up.”

The survey of more than 2,000 adults also revealed that older patients tend to have more negative perceptions of dental visits than their younger counterparts, and nearly one in five of those polled lacks certainty about their personal dental health.

“We want to address the factors that are preventing patients from feeling confident and comfortable in their interactions with their dentists,” Mersky explained. “Sharing quality information about the true ins and outs of oral health will open communication channels and help make patient-dentist relationships what they should be. It’s time to take the worry and mystery out of a dental visit and make the experience one that builds confidence instead.”

In support of the aim of empowering patients through access to dental information, Speaking The Tooth materials are now available on the OPT-In website, www.optindentaladvantage.com/blog.

OPT-In Dental Advantage is the nation’s first branded private practice organization dedicated to patient advocacy. Founded in 2014 by Dr. Dean Mersky, an industry veteran with over 25 years’ experience practicing dentistry, OPT-In provides patients with the tools and knowledge they need to communicate effectively with their dentists.

Serving over 60,000 patients annually, OPT-In also offers patients access to high-quality private practice dentists with offices in thirty states throughout the country.

(Source: OPT-In Dental Advantage)

Nearly half of all patients consider going to the dentist a ‘necessary evil,’ according to a recent survey. (Photo: Pierre Drap, freeimages.com)

February 12, 2016 8:27 pm
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P. gingivalis could be a risk factor for oesophageal cancer

One hundred patients with OSCC who underwent oesophagectomy surgery between 2010 and 2014 and 30 controls participated in the study. For each patient, tissue was…

One hundred patients with OSCC who underwent oesophagectomy surgery between 2010 and 2014 and 30 controls participated in the study. For each patient, tissue was harvested from cancer sites and adjacent sites and investigated.

The research team measured the expression of lysine-gingipain, an enzyme unique to P. gingivalis, and the presence of the bacterial cell DNA within the oesophageal tissue. The prevalence of both the bacteria-distinguishing enzyme and its DNA was significantly higher in the cancerous tissue of OSCC patients than in surrounding tissue or normal control sites. P. gingivalis was detected in 61 per cent of cancerous tissue and 12 per cent of adjacent tissue and was undetected in normal oesophageal mucosa.

The researchers also found that the presence of P. gingivalis correlated with other factors, including cancer cell differentiation, metastasis and overall survival rate.

“These findings provide the first direct evidence that P. gingivalis infection could be a novel risk factor for OSCC, and may also serve as a prognostic biomarker for this type of cancer,” said Dr Huizhi Wang, Assistant Professor of Oral Immunology and Infectious Diseases at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry in the US, who conducted the study in collaboration with the First Affiliated Hospital and College of Clinical Medicine of Henan University of Science and Technology in China. “These data, if confirmed, indicate that eradication of a common oral pathogen may contribute to a reduction in the significant number of people suffering with OSCC.”

Wang offered two explanations: either OSCC cells are a preferred niche for P. gingivalis to thrive or the infection of P. gingivalis facilitates the development of oesophageal cancer. If the former is true, simple antibiotics may prove useful or researchers could develop other therapeutic approaches for oesophageal cancer utilising genetic technology to target P. gingivalis and ultimately destroy the cancer cells, Wang said.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 15,000 people in the US alone are diagnosed with oesophageal cancer each year.

The study, titled “Presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in esophagus and its association with the clinicopathological characteristics and survival in patients with esophageal cancer”, was published online on 19 January in the Infectious Agents and Cancer journal.

From left: Prof. Jan S. Potempa, Associate Professor David A. Scott, Dr Richard J. Lamont and Assistant Professor Dr Huizhi Wang. The researchers inverstigated the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis in oesophageal cancer. (Photograph: University of Louisville School of Dentistry)

MEDENCY débuts at AEEDC

Laser is one of the newest developments in dentistry, and has stimulated growth in the medical and dental equipment market. In dental surgery in particular,…

Laser is one of the newest developments in dentistry, and has stimulated growth in the medical and dental equipment market. In dental surgery in particular, laser offers numerous benefits, rendering treatment more effective for the dentist and less painful for the patient, accelerating treatment and leading to significantly improved patient outcomes.

Over the past several years, Boschi, who is a distinguished laser dentistry expert and has collaborated with several major academies as a trainer, evaluated business opportunities for the promotion of laser use in day-to-day dentistry. His newly founded company MEDENCY is the result.

“Our flagship product PRIMO combines state-of-the-art diode laser technology with innovation and the experience of MEDENCY in the dental industry. PRIMO provides a variety of applications and is thus a viable alternative to conventional surgical methods like electrocautery and the scalpel. Owing to its intuitive interface, the device is easy to use,” Boschi told Dental Tribune Online.

“All MEDENCY products are designed, engineered and manufactured in Italy—with passion and commitment,” Boschi said.

In addition to its products, MEDENCY offers a full range of strategy and planning—from product design and development to clinical testing, covering governmental regulatory approval and manufacturing quality systems certification.

“Our overall mission is to deliver a combination of cutting-edge products, services and interaction with customers drawing on a wide network of academic partners,” stated Boschi, who has held many important leadership roles in the dental business over the past 15 years. “I have had the unique opportunity to work and deal with several managers and CEOs across Europe, the Middle East and Asia,” he said.

AEEDC attendees who wish to learn more about the company’s portfolio are invited to visit Booth P18 in Hall 6.

More information about MEDENCY can also be found online at www.medency.com.

Alessandro Boschi, General Manager at MEDENCY, at the company's booth at AEEDC Dubai 2016. (Photograph: Marc Chalupsky, DTI)

February 2, 2016 11:00 pm
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Educación del paciente sobre el cáncer oral

Además, los profesionales envueltos en el estudio discutieron más con sus pacientes sobre temas relacionados con el cáncer oral. Una proporción significativamente mayor de los…

Además, los profesionales envueltos en el estudio discutieron más con sus pacientes sobre temas relacionados con el cáncer oral. Una proporción significativamente mayor de los dentistas capacitados informaron a sus pacientes que habían sido examinados de cáncer oral.

Más de 40 dentistas participaron en el estudio, cuyos resultados fueron publicados recientemente en el British Dental Journal. Los odontólogos recibieron una actualización sobre el cáncer oral, una introducción a la guía de comunicación, así como actividades de aprendizaje y oportunidades para practicar la guía mediante juegos de roles y retroalimentación.

"No se trata de un guión a seguir, sino de una guía para establecer debates interactivos sobre los síntomas, la importancia de la detección temprana, y sobre cuándo y dónde buscar ayuda si se experimentan síntomas", explicó el coautor del estudio, Prof. Tim Newton.

Las últimas estadísticas del Cancer Research UK indican que 6.800 personas son diagnosticadas anualmente con cáncer bucal en el Reino Unido. Esta cifra se ha incrementado en un 50 por ciento en los últimos diez años.

A pesar de estas preocupantes cifras, la mayoría de los dentistas son reacios a discutir asuntos relacionados con el cáncer oral con sus pacientes durante citas regulares. Entre las barreras reportadas por los dentistas están el miedo a provocar ansiedad en el paciente, limitaciones de tiempo y falta de conocimiento de muchos dentistas sobre este tópico, según un estudio de 2015.
 

 

Muchos dentistas no saben cómo discutir el cáncer oral con sus pacientes (Foto: Wavebrakemedia / Shutterstock).

January 31, 2016 11:00 pm
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New brand Prima by Angelus presented at CIOSP

“Prima Dental has operated in this industry for over 150 years. Therefore, although it is a pioneering product for Angelus, we’ll be entering the market…

Prima Dental has operated in this industry for over 150 years. Therefore, although it is a pioneering product for Angelus, we’ll be entering the market with profound knowledge,” said Roberto Alcântara, President of Angelus.

According to Prima Dental Group CEO Richard Müller, Prima Dental exports to over 85 countries throughout the world. He stated that the collaboration between Prima Dental and Angelus is based on a common interest in developing innovation and technology in dental products.

“In a phone call, Roberto and I made lists, summarizing the vision of each company—they were aligned! From that point on, we assessed several financial, technical, marketing and legal aspects to understand this market, and considered the benefits of a partnership. Eighteen months later, we launched our company Angelus Prima Dental, with our factory in London in the UK. Here at CIOSP, this week, we are launching our brand Prima by Angelus to the entire market,” Müller said.

Richard Müller (left), CEO of the Prima Dental Group and Roberto Alcântara, President of Angelus (Photograph: Dental Tribune Brazil)

Bristol researchers receive funding for super-chlorhexidine

Overall, Pertinax Pharma has received around £900,000 from southern England technology investor Mercia Fund Management, Innovate UK (through its Aid for Start-Ups scheme) and an…

Overall, Pertinax Pharma has received around £900,000 from southern England technology investor Mercia Fund Management, Innovate UK (through its Aid for Start-Ups scheme) and an unnamed private investor. The company’s founder and chief scientific officer, Dr Michele Barbour, who is also a senior lecturer in biomaterials at the university’s School of Oral and Dental Sciences, said that the company will focus on the development of applications in dentistry first, where the technology already has relevance to a number of areas. Further uses in medicine will follow in time.

“We’re very excited about Pertinax’s potential,” she said.

A proven antimicrobial agent, chlorhexidine has been used in a wide range of products and treatment processes to prevent and treat bacterial infections. Since it is a new formulation of the substance, Pertinax is reported to possess the same antibacterial properties, but without some of the shortcomings of the original formulation, such as short efficacy time. Possible future applications are its use in cements to reduce the failure rates of dental fillings, for example.

“With a strong management team and innovative product, Pertinax Pharma has the potential to take its product from dental tool to a must-have anti-infective across a wide range of industries, from veterinary care, to cosmetics and even home appliances,” Investment Manager at Mercia Fund Management Dr Brijesh Roy commented.

Mercia Fund Management recently provided funding for another oral health care-related project by the University of Manchester.

Dr Michele Barbour (Photograph: Bhagesh Sachania, University of Bristol)

Roland DG announces changes in leadership

The leadership change will be implemented as part of the mid-term business plan for 2016–2020 and a new organisational structure to facilitate new business development….

The leadership change will be implemented as part of the mid-term business plan for 2016–2020 and a new organisational structure to facilitate new business development.

Tomioka has been the President of Roland DG for 30 years. Among other important projects, he spearheaded the transformation of the company from manufacturing pen plotters to producing 3-D desktop fabrication tools, vinyl cutters and wide-format inkjet printers while achieving worldwide sales leadership with high profitability. Only recently, the company invested in inkjet and 3-D technologies to expand into the on-demand digital printing and health care industries under his management.

Fujioka, who joined the company in 2014, has broad experience in ink, inkjet print head, 3-D and UV technologies. His expertise will help the company quickly develop a variety of new products and solutions, Roland DG stated. Prior to his employment at Roland DG, Fujioka was a director at Riso Kagaku, a manufacturer of copy and printing machines, and before that he spent 25 years at Seiko Instruments, where he oversaw the integration of profitable service components into core offerings.

“These are exciting times at Roland DG and I am honoured to serve as President,” Fujioka said. “Roland DG offers a sophisticated product line with a passionate culture and family spirit. While upholding its corporate culture and spirit, I intend to turn the company into a more progressive and innovative organisation to achieve sustainable growth,” Fujioka added. “My goal is to shift our business to a new digital era model that will serve as a foundation for the next big leap in growth by capitalising on our GlobalOne business platform. Together, we will unlock the full potential of our employees worldwide in order to realise new market creation with products and services that exceed customer expectations.”

Masahiro Tomioka (left) will be succeeded by Hidenori Fujioka as President of the Roland DG Corporation. (Photographs: Roland DG Corporation)

February 15, 2016 11:00 pm
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Endodoncia vs Implantes en Nueva York

El tema de la conferencia del Dr. Ensinas fue Endodoncia vs Implantes, tópico que despertó el interés de una gran cantidad de público, que llenó…

El tema de la conferencia del Dr. Ensinas fue Endodoncia vs Implantes, tópico que despertó el interés de una gran cantidad de público, que llenó el salón de conferencias.

"En realidad, hemos tratado fundamentalmente el tema de implantes versus endodoncia, pero desde una óptica no de elección de uno u otro, sino de implantes apoyados desde el punto de vista científico cuando hace falta realmente o cuando está indicado", explicó el Dr. Ensinas.

El experto afirma que los implantes últimamente están siendo sobreexplotados a nivel mundial debido a que se han convertido en un procedimiento muy económico y redituable, a diferencia de la endodoncia.

"Sacar un diente y reemplazarlo con un implante es mucho más fácil, y las tasas de éxito en implantes no son tal como se explican, sino que hay índices de fracaso como en endodoncia", continúa.

"El gran problema del implante es que no forma hueso, mientras que la endodoncia sí, porque el hueso es dependiente del ligamento periodontal. Siempre y cuando tenga un diente con ligamento, vamos a estimular el hueso. Así que yo, manteniendo el diente a través de un tratamiento endodóntico o retratamiento o una cirugía periapical, siempre voy a mantener los niveles de hueso y las crestas alveolares en su lugar", explica el Dr. Ensinas.

Si es más fácil hacer una extracción que mantener un diente, la pregunta que surge entonces es: "¿Qué eligirías tú para tu hijo o tu mujer: mantener un diente en el sector anterior o sacarlo para colocar un implante?"

El problema, según Ensinas, es que la implantología está, "no en boga, sino sobreexplotada, cuando la implantología tiene que estar correctamente indicada. Yo no estoy en contra de los implantes: estoy a favor de los implantes cuando están bien indicados".

Las indicaciones para colocar implantes deben ser hechas por el endodoncista, "cuando el endodoncista define que un elemento dentario no puede ser salvado, ya que para perder un diente o para extraer un diente hacen falta muchos parámetros previos", continúa el experto.

"El primer punto es el tratamiento endodóntico que, de acuerdo a índices de éxito y fracaso, oscila entre el 85 y 96%. En el 10% de tratamientos endodónticos que fracasan, que es una tasa muy baja, podemos hacer un retratamiento, si bien también en el tratamiento de conducto cuenta la experiencia del endodoncista y del odontólogo general".
"Si un odontólogo general trata un incisivo, las posibilidades de éxito endodóntico probablemente sean mayores que si trata un molar o un tercer molar, por ejemplo. Si aún así fracasa, tenemos la posibilidad de un retratamiento, y los índices de los retratamientos endodónticos para mantener un diente son altísimos: un 90% cuando están correctamente realizados. Y si el retratamiento fracasa, tenemos todavía otra opción, que es la cirugía periapical o la cirugía endodóntica, con todos los parámetros que incluye, que no solamente es apicectomía y curetajes. Es decir, que para sacar un diente hay mucho tiempo y hay muchos pasos previos: el tema es capacitarse", explica el Dr. Ensinas.

En cuanto a la fobia de muchos pacientes ante la endodoncia, el experto argentino sostiene que si se le explican las ventajas del tratamiento endodóntico con respecto a un implante, los pacientes no suelen tener problema en elegir un tratamiento de conductos.

Recursos
ESI Barcelona
GNYDM

 

El Dr. Pablo Ensinas durante su conferencia en el Greater New York Dental Meeting 2015.

January 10, 2016 11:00 pm
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EXPODENTAL 2016 celebra la mayor edición de su historia

Madrid se convertirá así, en la capital mundial del sector durante 3 días, donde abrir nuevas oportunidades de negocio, presentar y conocer las tendencias y…

Madrid se convertirá así, en la capital mundial del sector durante 3 días, donde abrir nuevas oportunidades de negocio, presentar y conocer las tendencias y los productos más innovadores del sector, así como multiplicar los contactos.

La décimo cuarta edición de EXPODENTAL, Salón Internacional de Equipos, Productos y Servicios Dentales, que organiza IFEMA en colaboración con la Federación Española de Empresas de Tecnología Sanitaria –FENIN-, se perfila como la mayor y más completa convocatoria sectorial de cuantas se han celebrado hasta la fecha.

Precisamente, y en previsión de este crecimiento, la organización de EXPODENTAL decidió, hace unos meses, la ampliación del espacio en más de 1.000 m2.
 

Otro dato a destacar es la participación de 54 nuevas empresas en EXPODENTAL 2016, así como la significativa presencia de firmas extranjeras procedentes, además de España, de Alemania, China, Corea, Dinamarca, Francia, Italia, Malasia, México, Países Bajos, Polonia, Portugal, Suecia y Suiza, lo que confirma la progresiva dimensión internacional que viene caracterizando al certamen y su fuerte posicionamiento en el ranking ferial europeo de su sector.

Por otra parte, entre las novedades de esta edición, se encuentra la incorporación del área de Formación, que concentrará toda la oferta del sector dental, en relación a las etapas académicas de postgrado y especialidades y formación continua de las empresas y que ofrecerá un contexto de información de gran interés para futuros profesionales. En esta misma línea de objetivos que pone el foco de atención en futuros profesionales, se celebrará el Día del Estudiante, el jueves 10 de marzo.

Además, y como ya es habitual, de forma paralela a la exhibición comercial, se desarrollará en el Speakers´Corner, un programa de presentaciones que abordará los últimos tratamientos y avances tecnológicos de una industria en permanente desarrollo.

EXPODENTAL reunirá una completa oferta de productos y novedades en torno a los sectores de equipamiento y mobiliario de prótesis; consumo e instrumental de clínica; consumo e instrumental de prótesis; implantología; ortodoncia, y servicios e informática, convirtiéndose, una vez más, en el escaparate por excelencia del sector y el punto de encuentro clave de profesionales y compañías de equipos y productos dentales.

Fotos: Dental Tribune International)

Shofu: “We see the fastest growth coming from China”

While trade show attendees from the Middle East expressed great interest in Shofu’s materials and digital dental cameras, the company feels that the market conditions…

While trade show attendees from the Middle East expressed great interest in Shofu’s materials and digital dental cameras, the company feels that the market conditions do not facilitate foreign investment. “Our meetings were good—although the fair could have been stronger. We met dentists and dental students from the UAE, Kuwait, Iran and Iraq. This is a big market, especially for Asian companies, but the market needs to open more to ease import and export,” stated Patrick Loke, Managing Director of Shofu Dental Asia-Pacific during AEEDC. Given the company’s history, Shofu is continuing its careful assessment of business opportunities before possibly opening a production facility or sales office in the Middle East.

Shofu was founded in 1922 in Kyoto at the time when growing national debt and political uproar endangered Japan’s strong economy. The company initially produced high-quality porcelain teeth for the local market, but soon added abrasives, silicone polishers, composites and amalgam fillings to its portfolio. The 1970s saw the opening of new manufacturing facilities in Japan and sales offices in the US and Germany, while Asia Pacific remained relatively untouched despite Shofu’s geographical proximity.

Shofu finally established a new subsidiary in Singapore in 1980. Since then, Shofu Dental Asia-Pacific has reached a number of milestones in the region. In 1985, Shofu began operating in China with the establishment of a worldwide sales network and opened a production facility and sales office 20 years later. Back then, the country had only 50,000 dentists and fewer than 200 dental clinics to serve its 1.3 billion people—about 440,000 dental professionals would have been needed to provide adequate oral health care according to Western standards.

In the last decade, the Chinese government has invested substantially in dental training facilities and schools. The result was an increase in dental clinics that led to double-digit growth in relatively new market segments, such as dental implants.

Loke is very pleased with Shofu’s sales in China. “We see the fastest growth coming from China. For the most part, China is now a fully developed country with huge opportunities to conduct business. We have experienced a double-digit increase in Chinese sales and the nation remains our most important market in the region,” he said during AEEDC. “Other countries in the South-East Asian region are also developed but growth is slower. However, India is coming up. Shofu will start operating in India soon. There is growing awareness regarding dental health there.”

Shofu Dental Asia-Pacific's booth at AEEDC Dubai 2016. (Photograph: Marc Chalupsky, DTI)

February 22, 2016 1:26 pm
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Delivered: The pre-contoured, stainless-steel crowns you wanted

According to the company, all NuSmile crowns are engineered to help customers increase practice productivity while ensuring great results for their patients, all at an…

According to the company, all NuSmile crowns are engineered to help customers increase practice productivity while ensuring great results for their patients, all at an excellent value.

“If these pre-contoured stainless-steel crowns were going to carry the NuSmile brand, we knew they had to be something truly special,” said Diane Johnson Krueger, NuSmile founder and CEO. “And after talking with our customers, we decided that the best way to make these crowns truly special was to make sure they fit better without the need for trimming or contouring, delivering better retention and shorter working time compared to other stainless-steel crowns. We’ve also found that many of our customers don’t actually know the cost of the crown they are currently purchasing. Our new SSCs are not only better, they are priced better too!”

NuSmile SSC Pre-contoured crowns are highly polished to make it difficult for plaque to adhere and cause further decay in adjacent teeth. In addition, they are anatomically accurate with a more functional occlusal anatomy. Their broader occlusal table and better-defined cuspal anatomy provide more functional mastication.

Made of corrosion-resistant surgical grade 316 stainless steel, NuSmile SSC Pre-contoured crowns are laser-etched on the lingual side for lasting identification. Unlike ink printing, these markings are indelible and stand up to autoclaving. These crowns also seldom require trimming because of an optimized gingival-occlusal height. And on the occasion in which trimming or contouring is required, the company says its NuSmile SSC Pre-contoured crowns’ tempering makes the process very easy.

“It’s a special thrill to be able to introduce the best designed line of pre-contoured stainless-steel crowns our industry has ever seen,” Krueger said, “but it’s that much more special to know they will be affordable for our customers and their patients.”

 

Nikki Ruck of NuSmile, with the company’s new contoured crowns, at the recent Yankee Dental Congress. (Photo: Fred Michmershuizen, DTA)

February 8, 2016 11:00 pm
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“WORLD CANCER DAY” – Bahria University arranges oral health seminar

The objective of this seminar was to emphasize the intensity of this disease prevailing in our society, to encourage its prevention, through early detection and…

The objective of this seminar was to emphasize the intensity of this disease prevailing in our society, to encourage its prevention, through early detection and treatment and educating the audience on how they can make a difference in the fight against cancer so as to reduce the global burden of this life threatening disease.

Headed by Dr Daud Mirza, HOD Oral Pathology, BUMDC, the seminar was assisted by Dr Ghazal Raza and Dr Zara Karim. Guest speaker Dr Ghazanfar Hassan, Associate Professor and Chairman of OMFS at Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences (LUMHS) Jamshoro, as well as the speakers from Pathology Department- Prof Dr Mohiuddin Alamgir and Dr Kulsoom Fatima, HOD Department of Community Dentistry (BUMDC) – expressed their views on the topic.

The speakers drew the audience attention towards the risk factors involved in the development of oral cancer, considered as the most prevalent head and neck cancer.

As to the risk factors for oral cancer, Dr Daud Mirza said the dental community is the first line of defence in early detection of the disease. There are scores of opportunities available to catch oral cancer in its early stages. “Our goal should be to initiate efforts within the dental community to aggressively screen all of the patients visiting their practices.” The dental community has to assume its leadership role if oral cancer is to be brought down from its undeserved position as a killer.

Dr Daud Mirza and Dr Mohiuddin Alamgir discussed different researches and statistical analyses done to see its prevalence worldwide. Dr Kulsoom Fatima spoke of the harmful effects of smoking, a the leading cause of oral cancer, highlighting as well the methods of how to quit it.

Lastly, Director General Vice Admiral (Rtd) Tehseen Ullah Khan HI(M), and Principal, Dental Section Prof Dr Zubair Ahmed Abbasi, appreciated the efforts of the Department of Oral Pathology for arranging this education-oriented seminar. The speakers were then presented with honorary shields and the program came to a successful end.Anchor-PR

File Photo

February 12, 2016 12:42 pm
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Photon Induced Photoacoustic Streaming

After scaling and root planning, the teeth were scheduled for root–canal therapy. Before treatment: PIPs Before each treatment the PIPS™ technique was applied into the…

After scaling and root planning, the teeth were scheduled for root–canal therapy.

Before treatment: PIPs

Before each treatment the PIPS™ technique was applied into the periodontal pockets of each tooth for refining the debridement, removal of biofilm from the root surfaces and pocket disinfection.

The root canal treatments were performed using PIPS–specific irrigation protocols with 5 percent NaOCl and 17 percent EDTA.

Obturation with resin sealer

The canals were obturated with a flowable resin sealer (Endoreze Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) and gutta–percha points. A final treatment of the pockets using PIPS for disinfection was performed after completing each root canal therapy to remove any extruded sealer or residual biofilm.

No post–op symptoms were reported and the mobility of the teeth progressively disappeared up to grade 0. The follow-up X–rays performed after one and four months showed healing in progress for both the teeth. Lightwalker AT laser device with contact H14–C handpiece and PIPS fiber tip was used for the treatment.

The Lightwalker parameters are: laser source: Er:YAG; wavelength: 2940 nm; pulse duration: SSP; energy: 15 mJ; frequency: 15 Hz.

About the author, disclosures

Olivi is an adjunct professor of endodontics at the University of Genoa School of Dentistry and a board member and professor in its master course in laser dentistry. He has relationships with several laser companies (including AMD-DENTSPLY, Biolase and Fotona) but receives no financial compensation for his research or for writing articles. Contact him at olivilaser@gmail.com.

 

Endontic treatment uses Lightwalker AT laser and PIPS fiber tip. Four months post–op. (Photo: Provided by Dr. Giovanni Olivi)

New coating could eliminate implant failure risk

The disruptive new anti-inflammatory polymer was developed by Dr. Kyle Battiston, a postdoctoral fellow at the Faculty of Dentistry and a recent graduate from the…

The disruptive new anti-inflammatory polymer was developed by Dr. Kyle Battiston, a postdoctoral fellow at the Faculty of Dentistry and a recent graduate from the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto. It was originally designed as a tissue-engineering scaffold that allows tissue engineers to grow cells successfully.

Battiston and his colleagues were able to coat implants with the biomaterial, which is derived from a family of polymers found to reduce inflammation, specifically when it interacts with white blood cells, and discovered that the coating calms the body’s immune response.

“We’ve learned this family of materials can retain its anti-inflammatory character while adapting diverse physical properties,” said Battiston. The material could thus be used for a wide variety of medical treatments.

Battiston plans to market the coating through his new start-up company KSP2 within the next five years.

According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, 3 million Americans already have dental implants and this number is growing by 500,000 a year. About 10 percent of all U.S. dentists place implants today. The association estimates that the U.S. and European market for dental implants will reach $4.2 billion by 2022.

In addition to the inflammatory body response, various factors, such as tobacco use and poor oral hygiene, can contribute to early loss of dental implants. (Photograph: Anna Moskvina/Shutterstock)

January 13, 2016 11:00 pm
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Bluephase: Two new products for a precise and economic use

The dental radiometer Bluephase Meter II offers a simple and yet precise solution. Conventional radiometers often allow a limited check of the light intensity of…

The dental radiometer Bluephase Meter II offers a simple and yet precise solution.

Conventional radiometers often allow a limited check of the light intensity of the polymerization device only. The reason fo this are diverse technical limitations, such as the strictly defined diameter of the light measuring cell. As a rule, only approximate values are measured for each type of device (halogen, plasma, LED etc.). Owing to this fact, conventional radiometers can only be used for a relative light measurement or for checking the consistency of the light intensity.

Bluephase Meter II:
Universal use
Bluephase Meter II precisely defines as the sole radiometer the light intensity of the polymerization devices, regardless of the type of design. With Bluephase Meter II, the light intensity of Bluephase Style can be regularly and reliably checked. In comparison to the gold standard, the Ulbricht sphere, the deviation in measurement is only + 10 per cent. If this radiometer is applied constantly in the daily practice treatments, the long-term success of direct and indirect restorations will be enhanced.

Bluephase Style M8:
The LED for economical use
For the polymerization of some dental material, e.g. fissure sealants, a lower light intensity is required than for the polymerization with composites. As long as these dental materials are completely cured within a wave length range between 430 and 490 nm, a polymerization device of the second LED generation like the Bluephase Style M8 with a light intensity of 800 mW/cm2 can be used. The successor model of the mains operated Bluephase C8 complements the product family around Bluephase Style and stands out with a convincing price-performance ratio.

Bluephase is a registered trademark ot the Ivoclar Vivadent AG.

Bluephase Meter II: Dental radiometer for checking the intensity of the polymerization devices

Preventing tooth decay: Dental sealants compared with fluoride varnishes

In order to compare both intervention methods, the researchers reviewed eight studies published between 1984 and 2014. The analyses included 1,127 participants, who were randomly…

In order to compare both intervention methods, the researchers reviewed eight studies published between 1984 and 2014. The analyses included 1,127 participants, who were randomly assigned to receive dental sealant (or sealant together with fluoride varnish) or fluoride varnish applications, and the extent of tooth decay was compared. Participants were 5–10 years of age at the start of the trial.

According to the researchers, some evidence suggests that applying resin-based sealants to the biting surfaces of permanent posterior teeth in children may reduce tooth decay by 3.7 per cent over a two-year period, and by 29 per cent over a nine-year period, compared with fluoride varnish applications.

Regarding the application of resin-based sealants together with fluoride varnish to the biting surfaces of the permanent posterior teeth, they found a reduction of tooth decay of 14.4 per cent over a two-year period compared with fluoride varnish alone. According to the investigators, the effects of applying glass ionomer sealants may be similar to those seen when fluoride varnish is applied.

Although some evidence suggests the superiority of resin-based fissure sealants over fluoride varnishes applied to prevent occlusal caries in permanent molars, the results cannot be generalised, said Dr Anneli Ahovuo-Saloranta, from the Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment and a member of the research team.

“Drawing conclusions on the basis of the scarce data reported in this review is also complicated because information on confounding factors, such as snacking habits or use of fluoride products, and on caries incidence without any intervention was incomplete,” Ahovuo-Saloranta told Dental Tribune Online.

Moreover, she stressed that fluoride varnishes are used for other indications too, for example, to approximate or smooth surfaces and thus both can be used simultaneously. Generally, both the preferred treatment method and the effectiveness of the intervention can differ greatly from patient to patient, she stressed.

The current analysis was an update of a review first published in 2006 and last updated in 2010.

Apart from application of dental sealants and topical fluorides at dental clinics, preventive treatment options for tooth decay include toothbrushing with a fluoride toothpaste and use of fluoride supplements (e.g. fluoride tablets).

The article, titled “Pit and fissure sealants versus fluoride varnishes for preventing dental decay in the permanent teeth of children and adolescents”, was published online on 18 January in the Cochrane Library database.

Researchers from the Cochrane Oral Health Group have aimed to assess whether dental sealants or fluoride varnishes are more effective at reducing tooth decay. (Photograph: Dmitry Kalinovsky/Shutterstock)

February 8, 2016 11:00 pm
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El Consejo General de Dentistas denuncia que España tiene casi el triple de dentistas de los que necesita

El presidente del Consejo General de Colegios de Dentistas, Óscar Castro, denuncia que España tiene casi el triple de profesionales de los necesarios, según las…

El presidente del Consejo General de Colegios de Dentistas, Óscar Castro, denuncia que España tiene casi el triple de profesionales de los necesarios, según las recomendaciones de organismos oficiales, de ahí que urja al Gobierno a tomar medidas que mejoren el futuro de la profesión.

Actualmente en España hay un dentista por cada 1.200 habitantes pero, según recomienda la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS), sería suficiente con una ratio de 1 por cada 3.500 habitantes en función de la epidemiología y la demanda asistencial.

Además, ha explicado Castro en una entrevista a Europa Press, las previsiones no son halagüeñas ya que «cada año salen unos 1.750 profesionales de las facultades españolas», lo que hace que en 2020 se prevea una ratio de un dentista por cada mil habitantes.

«Nos encontramos ante una plétora de profesionales tremenda, que da lugar a paro, emigración y subempleo», ha reconocido el presidente de los dentistas, que achaca este incremento de profesionales a la falta de control en la apertura de nuevas facultades o la falta de un sistema de ‘numerus clausus’ como el que hay en Medicina.

De hecho, actualmente el desempleo afecta al 25 por ciento de los nuevos titulados, y el 80 por ciento piden el certificado de buena conducta que emite el Consejo General «con la intención de irse al extranjero porque aquí no encuentran trabajo», según Castro. Los países más receptores de dentistas españoles, apunta, son Irlanda y Reino Unido.

Otro de los factores que favorecen este exceso de profesionales e impulsan su salida de España es la ausencia de una cartera de servicios bucodentales dentro del Sistema Nacional de Salud (SNS).
«No es de recibo que en pleno siglo XXI la sanidad española siga con ese gran vacío», ha defendido el presidente del Consejo General, que recuerda que en países del norte de la Unión Europea el Estado asume muchas de estas prestaciones, bien de forma directa o a través de ayudas o subvenciones según el tipo de tratamiento. «Junto con el resfriado, la caries es la enfermedad más extendida del mundo, pero también de las más olvidadas», ha lamentado.

Esta situación, ha explicado, da lugar a la proliferación de clínicas y a la creación de franquicias que, a su juicio, «han cambiado el sentir de esta profesión sanitaria hacia una línea más comercial».
PRECIOS GANCHO Y OFERTAS QUE BANALIZAN LAS PRESTACIONES

De hecho, este experto lamenta que en los últimos años el sector odontológico ha entrado en una guerra de «precios gancho» y «ofertas agresivas» para atraer nuevos clientes que ha banalizado estas prestaciones, y reclama una «regulación exigente de la publicidad».

«La gente se ha acostumbrado a ver famosos anunciando implantes como si anunciaran una línea de telefonía», ha denunciado Castro, que exige que la publicidad de estos servicios sea «precisa, veraz, comprensible y prudente». «Debemos orientar nuestras prácticas a necesidades de salud, no a intereses mercantiles», ha incidido.

El presidente de los dentistas recuerda que en otros países como Francia o Bélgica la publicidad está «fuertemente limitada» y ni siquiera puede haber clínicas con acceso a pie de calle, pero en España sólo existe una normativa en cinco comunidades (Murcia, Navarra, Aragón, Asturias y País Vasco) mientras que «en el resto es la como la ley de la selva».

Por otro lado, Castro también ha exigido la necesidad de que el Gobierno ponga en marcha las especialidades odontológicas ya que, junto con Luxemburgo, es el único país de la Unión Europea donde no están reguladas; y reclama más medidas para combatir el intrusismo profesional que en los últimos años se ha incrementado coincidiendo con la crisis, ya que «el ciudadano busca alternativas más baratas».

January 21, 2016 12:41 pm
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UK scientists bubble over breakthrough in scaler research

By recording a scaler operating under the microscope at 10,000 times the speed of regular filming, they found tiny water bubbles forming at the end…

By recording a scaler operating under the microscope at 10,000 times the speed of regular filming, they found tiny water bubbles forming at the end of the scaler, a process known as cavitation. According to them, the area of cavitation near the free end of the tips increased with greater power and with the amplitudes of displacement at the tips.

Already observed in irrigation processes in endodontics, the formation and collapse of water bubbles create significant forces that could disrupt biofilm without touching the tooth’s surface, paving the way for new instrument designs that are less invasive, the researchers said in the paper.

“Other studies we have done, using electron microscopy, have shown that removal of plaque biofilm is increased when cavitation is increased. Putting the pieces together, we can therefore say that altering the shape and power of these commonly used tools make them more effective, and hopefully, pain-free,” commented recent PhD graduate and lead author of the paper Nina Vyas on the results.

School of Dentistry Professor Damien Walmsley added, “Removing dental plaque and calculus, that is the build-up of what we know as tartar or hard plaque, is a big part of maintaining oral health and a regular occurrence in dental check-ups. These findings will help us to understand how to make the tools as effective as possible.”

For the study, a Satelec P5 Newtron Scaler with Satelec tips 10P, 1 and 2 operating at medium and high speeds was recorded at up to 250,000 frames per second in a water tank. The tip displacement was then recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. It is the first time that both methods have been applied to study cavitation around ultrasonic scalers.

The study, titled “High speed imaging of cavitation around dental ultrasonic scaler tips,” was published online on 2 March in the PLOS One journal.

Contrast-enhanced image still from a high-speed video that shows cavitation around a scaler tip. (Photograph: University of Birmingham, UK)

Growing your practice with digital dentistry

Once you’ve made the decision to grow your patient base using digital dentistry, you have to target and engage potential patients. Here are the four…

Once you’ve made the decision to grow your patient base using digital dentistry, you have to target and engage potential patients. Here are the four most critical:

  1. Develop an impactful website.
  2. Execute a patient review strategy.
  3. Engage with your community on social media.
  4. Deliver targeted marketing campaigns.

You only have eight seconds to convert a lead

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the average attention span is now 8.25 seconds. Test this theory. Show your website to someone new and time them. What can they report back to you? The bottom line is: only a truly effective website can grab the attention of a prospective patient in less than eight seconds. And if you can’t grab their attention, you certainly can’t convert them.

Here are a few ways to ensure your website not only grabs the attention of prospects but, more importantly, turns them into patients.

Images with captions

Images with captions are read on average 300 percent more. Adding captions gives you a golden opportunity to show a tool like the Planmeca FIT system for open CAD/CAM and communicate why it benefits patients.

Videos

Visual learning leads to improved memory retention and comprehension and triggers an emotional response while motivating the learner. This is why television advertising remains the largest segment of advertising spending.

Q&A

You may only have eight seconds to get a new patient’s attention, but you also need to provide the depth of content to answer their questions and build credibility. A Q&A format is an easily digestible format for understanding and communicating the technology, ultimately building credibility.

Call-to-action

This may seem simple but is often forgotten on dental sites. Tell your patients the next step — whether it’s to call, email, book or simply learn more. You need to ensure your phone number is prominent and clickable on mobile devices. You also need to include a submit form for users who access your site during evenings and weekends.

Custom photography

High-quality, custom photography makes your practice approachable and gives you a chance to highlight the new technology you have invested in. A competitor website full of stock photos looks like any generic office, whereas using custom photography ensures your practice comes across as unique and personable.

Ask for patient reviews

Ask patients who have experienced the benefit of CAD/CAM technology to provide you with an online review on Google+, Facebook or Yelp. Online reviews build instant credibility when someone is looking for a dentist. Reading reviews about a positive experience and unique technology impacts people’s decision when looking for a dentist.

The best way to get reviews is to ask for them. Make it part of your daily routine. Send an email to the patients you saw that day and ask them to provide you with an online review. An email template can streamline this process.

Engage with your patients on Facebook

Having a vibrant Facebook profile is important. Potential and current patients are going to look on it. You want it filled with oral health tips and dental education, illustrating that you care about the oral health of the local community.

In addition to the general Facebook engagement, you have the option to boost your posts using targeted advertising to reach people who have not already liked your page. For example, you may share a post on the convenience of one-visit dentistry for the busy professional. Targeting options in Facebook are extremely powerful — not only can you target people based on demographic information, you can target based on interests, education and even areas of study.

Advertise on YouTube

Television advertising has been the primary medium to build brand awareness. The challenge for most dental offices is that television advertising is expensive and covers a geographic area beyond the service of their practice.

YouTube provides the impact of television ads, but in a targeted geographic area, meaning you can roll out highly engaging videos commercials with a much smaller budget.

In summary, digital marketing and the better mousetrap

Your investment in digital dentistry will help you stand out compared with other dentists in your local area. By initiating a comprehensive marketing strategy, you can display the technology you’ve invested in and increase the number of new patients who choose you and your office.

Brent Parr is president and CEO of Optio Publishing Inc. (Photo/Provided by Brent Parr)

New nanotechnology might improve bone restoration in dental patients

MicroRNA, a small noncoding RNA molecule found in plants, animals and some viruses, has shown promise in clinical research as a therapeutic agent for various…

MicroRNA, a small noncoding RNA molecule found in plants, animals and some viruses, has shown promise in clinical research as a therapeutic agent for various diseases, such as cancer and inflammatory diseases. It might also be able to enhance bone regeneration, the current study has found.

When delivered into endogenous stem cells, the microRNA instructs the cells to switch on their healing and bone-building mechanisms, explained Dr. Peter Ma, Professor of Dentistry and lead researcher on the project. It is typically very difficult for microRNA to breach the cell wall, Ma said. However, the polymer sphere developed by Ma and his colleagues enables the RNA molecule to easily enter the cell and encourage bone repair.

The advantage of this new technology is that it uses existing cells to repair wounds and therefore reduces the need to introduce foreign cells, which is a very difficult therapy and can result in the host rejecting the foreign cells or the development of tumors.

Bone repair is especially challenging in patients with healing problems. Millions of patients worldwide suffer from bone loss and associated functional problems, but growing and regenerating high-quality bone for specific applications is still very difficult with current technology, according to the researchers.

“The new technology we have been working on opens doors for new therapies using DNA and RNA in regenerative medicine and boosts the possibility of dealing with other challenging human diseases,” Ma explained. There are several possible applications in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Moreover, it could help patients with osteoporosis, as well as those undergoing bone surgery or joint repair.

“For patients with low bone quality, it’s often hard to utilize implants to restore dental functions. This technology can potentially regenerate bone in patients with poor healing capacity, enabling implantation,” Ma told Dental Tribune Online. He added that patients with periodontitis could also benefit from his findings. “Periodontal disease often ultimately results in tooth loss due to diminishing tooth-supporting bone. This technology will potentially lead to a therapy to restore the tooth-supporting bone and retain or strengthen otherwise falling teeth in such patients,” he stated.

The paper, titled “Cell-free 3D scaffold with two-stage delivery of miRNA-26a to regenerate critical-sized bone defects,” was published online in the Nature Communications journal on Jan. 14.

The use of dental implants in patients with low bone quality is often difficult. A new nanotechnology could now help dentists improve treatment of these patients. (Photograph: Lighthunter/Shutterstock)

SWISS DENTAL EDUCATION WEEK—Mixing work with pleasure

The scientific program includes presentations and workshops by renowned speakers, who will address topics such as esthetic restorations, endodontic treatment methods as well as the…

The scientific program includes presentations and workshops by renowned speakers, who will address topics such as esthetic restorations, endodontic treatment methods as well as the CAD/CAM system CEREC. The Swiss Dental Education Week offers a one-of-a-kind opportunity to broaden the professional horizon while discovering Switzerland’s many and varied attractions. Situated in the heart of Europe, the small and yet immensely diverse country of Switzerland offers breathtaking sceneries, a well-established and highly efficient infrastructure as well as a broad range of cultural activities that attracts millions of tourists every year.

For more than a decade, the event organizer MediAccess has been providing internationally recognized and certified dental training programs. The company’s wealth of experience guarantees high quality specialist events in great ambience for participants to relax and network with one another, gain expert knowledge and enjoy the events’ proceedings. Top-class speakers from the world of dentistry combined with an extensive, tailor-made leisure program create a unique event not to be missed at Switzerland’s financial metropolis, Zurich. Register now at www.mediaccess.ch/Registration.

The SWISS DENTAL EDUCATION WEEK will take place in Zurich in Switzerland. (Photograph: canadastock/Shutterstock)

February 10, 2016 4:47 pm
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Antidepressant use could increase implant failure risk

In the study, the researchers analyzed data from the medical charts of the university’s dental clinic patients in 2014. They found that of the few…

In the study, the researchers analyzed data from the medical charts of the university’s dental clinic patients in 2014. They found that of the few patients who experienced implant failures, 33 percent used antidepressants. For patients who did not experience failures, only 11 percent took the drug. Overall, the analysis showed that use of antidepressants increased the odds of implant failure fourfold. Each year of antidepressant use doubled the odds of failure, the researchers stated. Therefore, they advise patients using antidepressants to consult with their physician about the drug’s side effects and alternative methods of managing depression, anxiety or pain.

According to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11 percent of Americans aged 12 and over took antidepressant medication in 2011. Antidepressants were the third most common prescription drug taken by Americans of all ages in 2005–2008 and the most frequently used by persons aged 18–44. From the period 1988–1994 to the period 2005–2008, the rate of antidepressant use in the U.S. among all age groups increased by nearly 400 percent.

Antidepressant use has been associated with a number of side effects, including osteoporosis, akathisia, bruxism and dry mouth, all of which affect the implant healing process and are of concern for dentists with regard to oral and bone health, the investigators noted.

Currently, the researchers are planning to validate their initial findings in a larger-scale study.

The findings of the study, titled “A pilot study: Association between antidepressant use and implant failure,” will be presented on March 19 at the 45th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the American Association for Dental Research, held in conjunction with the 40th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research.

Antidepressants may play a crucial role in dental implant failure. (Photograph: Lea Rojec/Shutterstock)

Hans Geiselhöringer is new President of Nobel Biocare

Since 2011, Geiselhöringer has served as Executive Vice President of Research, Products and Development, shaping a highly competitive product and innovation pipeline. Prior to that,…

Since 2011, Geiselhöringer has served as Executive Vice President of Research, Products and Development, shaping a highly competitive product and innovation pipeline. Prior to that, he was Executive Vice President of Global Marketing and Products from 2010 to 2011 and Head of NobelProcera and Guided Surgery from 2009 to 2010. Geiselhöringer joined Nobel Biocare as Head of NobelProcera in 2008 and was appointed a member of the executive committee in 2009. From 2004 to 2009, he acted as a global speaker for Nobel Biocare.

In 1998, he founded DentalX, a leading dental laboratory chain specialising in implantology, anaplastology, functional and aesthetic reconstructions, as well as imaging technologies. Geiselhöringer is a trained dental technician and possesses great technical knowledge of the implant and CAD/CAM industries, as well as deep customer understanding and insights, enabling continuity of innovation at Nobel Biocare. As a distinguished expert on dental technologies and materials, he has authored and co-authored various clinical and research articles. He is also a member of numerous international dental associations and a recognised lecturer at dental conventions throughout the world.

Geiselhöringer said, “Our focus on the patient remains steadfast and constant. Everything we do will continue to be patient-centred, clinically relevant and evidence based. To strengthen our leadership in implant-based dentistry we strongly focus on providing integrated digital solutions to improve the customer experience and increase productivity on all levels while ensuring a high level of clinical success and predictability. With our counterparts at KaVo Kerr Group, we have all the pieces in place today and we are grouping our highly skilled global teams together to form the industry’s new digital dentistry powerhouse. In summary, we at Nobel Biocare will continue our strong commitment to innovation, providing an ongoing pipeline of superior solutions that helps more customers treat more patients better.”

Hans Geiselhöringer (Photograph: Nobel Biocare)

January 18, 2016 11:00 pm
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Cochrane finds crowns superior to dental fillings

Named after its inventor, a Scottish dentist, the Hall technique uses a preformed metal crown that is fitted over the tooth with no local anaesthetic,…

Named after its inventor, a Scottish dentist, the Hall technique uses a preformed metal crown that is fitted over the tooth with no local anaesthetic, carious tissue removal or tooth preparation. First introduced a decade ago, it was originally developed as a non-invasive treatment for decayed primary molars.

For their review, the researchers looked at the clinical outcomes of several studies comparing fillings with crowns that were fitted with either conventional methods or the Hall technique. They also included studies that compared preformed crowns with non-restorative caries management, as well as preformed metal crowns with preformed white crowns.

While the review found no evidence of the superiority of one crown type to another, the results showed that teeth restored with preformed crowns compared with fillings are less likely to develop problems or cause pain over time.

“Crowns are recommended for restoring primary molars that have had a pulp treatment, are very decayed or are badly broken down. However, few dental practitioners use them in clinical practice,” the researchers said in the report.

With the review, the researchers originally sought to determine whether the clinical outcome of primary teeth restored with preformed crowns or with fillings was in any way related to the extent of their decay.

The review updates a previous version on the subject, originally published by the group in 2007.

Photo showing a preformed metal crown fitted with the Hall technique. (Photograph courtesy of Dr Iyad Hussein, UAE)

Juegos y vídeos para el Día Mundial de la Salud Oral

La Federación Dental Internacional (FDI) ha creado para la ocasión una serie de emocionantes nuevos materiales y su primer juego para smart phone. El juego,…

La Federación Dental Internacional (FDI) ha creado para la ocasión una serie de emocionantes nuevos materiales y su primer juego para smart phone.

El juego, llamado Mad Mouths, se lanza en marzo y desafía a los jugadores a eliminar la mayor cantidad de placa y alimentos antes de que acabe el juego, reiterando los múltiples beneficios de lavarse los dientes. Esta plataforma dinámica permite la comunicación directa con los pacientes de consejos para el cuidado bucal.

El Día Mundial de la Salud Oral un divertido y atractivo video anima a pasar 2 minutos dos veces al día dedicados únicamente a cepillarse los dientes, el cual se podrá ver también en YouTube. La FDI exhorta a los profesionales dentales a compartir el video con sus pacientes y a través de las redes sociales.

Además, se ha desarrollado también una estrategia única mediante redes sociales para el Día Mundial de la Salud Oral 2016 destinada a ayudar a los dentistas que inspiren a sus pacientes para que mejoren el cuidado oral.

Los profesionales dentales, empresas e instituciones que deseen participar en las actividades del Día Mundial de la Salud Oral de este año y animar a los pacientes a mejorar su salud oral están invitados a enviar un correo electrónico a WOHD@fdiworldental.org para obtener una guía de campaña completa. La guía está disponible en español, francés e inglés e incluye materiales de la campaña para descargar, tales como carteles, diseños de memes sociales e información sobre el video y el juego para teléfono inteligente del Día Mundial de la Salud Oral.

Recursos
Día Mundial de la Salud Oral
 

 

February 29, 2016 11:00 pm
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“One miracle at a time” – an implant case report

This has led to successful treatment of many patients in an accelerated protocol, often offering early or even immediate restoration of the implants. Those who…

This has led to successful treatment of many patients in an accelerated protocol, often offering early or even immediate restoration of the implants. Those who have become involved with implants in the last few years may take this early or immediate loading for granted, and consider it to be the norm for most patients; however only by careful case selection can we ensure predictable success.

Some patients however present with a complex mix of problems that necessitate a slower, systematic approach to implant treatment if optimum results are to be achieved. Professor Dennis Tarnow of Columbia University, one of the world’s leading implant specialists, has a well used maxim… “Let’s do one miracle at a time”. The purpose of this article is to present one such case when only by a stage by stage systematic approach was a good result achieved for the patient.

Case Report
Patient RR was a healthy non-smoking 44 year old male who presented with a complaint of an unaesthetic upper right central incisor with extensive recession showing a large amount of darkened labial root surface. The situation was worsened by a high smile line and a porcelain crown contrasting dramatically with the root colour. He had had periodic swelling at the apical part of the recession over a long period. There was a history of trauma in his teens leading to root canal treatment and a crown, and subsequent apicectomy in his 20s. Clinical examination revealed an otherwise periodontally healthy, well looked-after mouth. (Fig. 1, 2, 3)

Diagnosis was of endodontic failure and possible root fracture leading to loss of labial bone and soft tissue.
With a complex situation such as this, it often beneficial to visualize the end result – in this case an implant supported crown, supported by adequate bone and soft tissue providing gum line symmetry – then to work out “how do I get there from here”?
In this case the treatment plan was essentially divided into 3 stages:

• Rebuilding the lost soft tissue – necessary to close over bone graft materials and give symmetry
• Rebuilding the lost bone – necessary to provide support for an implant
• Replacing the tooth 

In detail these involved:
Rebuilding the lost soft tissue
1. Fabrication of a tooth borne immediate partial denture
2. Extraction and the split root confirmed (Fig. 4)
3. De-epithelialise the socket and ensure bone bleeding
4. A connective tissue and epithelial graft from the tuberosity – using a distal wedge technique
5. Bilateral pedicles using adjacent papilla to cover the connective tissue surfaces of the tuberosity graft (Fig. 5)
6. Fitting and adjusting as necessary the tooth borne immediate partial denture
7. Monitoring of soft tissue healing. Tissue from the tuberosity and adjacent papillae gives a better match than palatal tissue. We are ready to re-enter when incision lines fully closed. (Fig. 6, 7)

Rebuilding the lost bone
1. Re-entry was carried out at 4 months using a full thickness flap for access.
2. Underlying bone was curetted with a Rhodes chisel and a round bur was used on the labially-facing surface of bone to ensure bone bleeding (Fig. 8)
3. Endobon xenograft material (Biomet 3i) was placed after being moistened with blood and saline (Fig. 9)
4. OsseoGuard xenograft membrane (Biomet 3i) was trimmed and fitted once it seated passively under the flap (Fig. 10)
5. The flap was sutured with 4-0 silk to achieve primary closure over the site. (Fig. 11)
6. The partial denture was adjusted and refitted after ensuring there was no positive pressure in the area of the grafted bone.
7. Monitoring of healing. Sutures were removed at 2 weeks and periapical x-rays taken at 2 and 4 months to check for good graft condensation and to ensure there were no voids in the graft material. The timing of implant placement will also depends on bone available beyond root apex position

Replacing the tooth
1. The graft was left to mature for 6 months then a full thickness papillae preserving flap was used to access the site, revealing excellent regenerated bone
2. A 15mm Full Osseotite straight sided external hex implant (Biomet 3i) was placed with an insertion torque of 45Ncm. Because the implant was largely in regenerated bone, immediate restoration was not attempted. No additional grafting material was needed. (Fig. 12, 13)
3. After 4 months exposure was carried out using a punch gingivectomy approach.
4. A temporary cylinder was seated and a clear crown form was used with cold cure acrylic to fabricate a temporary crown. This was Torqued to 20N/cm and cotton wool and Cavit placed in the access hole. (Fig. 14, 15)
5. 4 Weeks healing was allowed for gingival contour to be developed (a little longer would have been preferred however the patient was moving away from the region) (Fig. 16)
6. Pick up coping impression was taken with Impregum injection into sulcus to capture emergence profile developed with the temporary crown. Occlusal records and shade were taken and agreement was reached with the patient on a midline diastema to improve symmetry. (Fig. 17)
7. The porcelain fused to metal, screw retained crown was tried in, and the fit and occlusion were checked then, after aesthetics had been approved by the patient, a square Goldtite screw was torqued to 32 N/cm and access sealed with cotton wool + composite (Figs 18, 19)
8. A final x-ray was taken and oral hygiene instruction and recall advice were given.
9. The patient returned one year later for a recall examination and x-ray and was still delighted with the aesthetic improvement (Fig. 20, 21, 22)

This case report illustrates the fact that not all tooth replacement problems can be managed by immediate or rapid implant restoration of the lost teeth. While the concepts of immediate replacement and immediate loading of implant prostheses certainly has a place in our armamentarium, it is not applicable to all situations and is certainly a long way from being a panacea. We may all enjoy fast food occasionally, but generally slower, more relaxed fine dining is preferred. It is perhaps appropriate to consider Dennis Tarnow’s maxim “Do one miracle at a time”.

“One miracle at a time”

World Oral Health Day 2016: Healthy Mouth. Healthy Body.

Oral disease affects 3.9 billion people worldwide, with between 60 per cent and 90 per cent of children globally suffering from tooth decay. Yet, poor…

Oral disease affects 3.9 billion people worldwide, with between 60 per cent and 90 per cent of children globally suffering from tooth decay. Yet, poor oral health goes far beyond the initial implications of dental disease and tooth decay; it has been associated with a number of health conditions, such as heart disease, pancreatic cancer, pneumonia and lung disease. In a recent study, 40 per cent of people with serious periodontal disease also reported suffering from an additional chronic condition.

Despite these links, people are unaware of the long-lasting and wide-ranging effects of poor oral health. Therefore, WOHD 2016 will shed light on the importance of good oral health in a simple and engaging way, encouraging understanding that good oral health is fundamentally intertwined with overall well-being.

The WOHD 2016 website, www.worldoralhealthday.org, focuses on communicating that prevention, early detection and treatment are key to ensuring the best outcomes and reducing oral disease and associated health complications.

A series of dynamic and engaging material, including a global video, new smartphone game, media strategy and social media content have been designed to inspire people across the world to participate in the WOHD campaign and improve their oral health regime.

Dental professionals, companies and institutions that would like to be involved in this year’s WOHD activities are invited to e-mail WOHD@fdiworldental.org for a full campaign guide, which is available in English, French and Spanish and includes materials for download, such as poster visuals, social meme designs and information on the WOHD video and smartphone game.

World Oral Health Day will be celebrated on 20 March. (Image: FDI World Dental Federation)

February 29, 2016 11:00 pm
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Una gran solución en implantes: arco completo de zirconia para edéntulos

El Dr. Patel, instructor clínico en el Instituto de Odontología Reconstructiva de Michigan, ha publicado numerosos artículos en revistas científicas, es conferencista y consultor clínico…

El Dr. Patel, instructor clínico en el Instituto de Odontología Reconstructiva de Michigan, ha publicado numerosos artículos en revistas científicas, es conferencista y consultor clínico sobre implantes y prótesis para diversas empresas y dirige clínicas privadas propias en Lenoir y Mooresville, en Carolina del Norte.

La conferencia del Dr. Patel en el ICOI Winter Implant Symposium, titulada “Full-Arch Implant Solutions: Overdentures or Fixed Monolithic Zirconia”, atrajo a una gran audiencia. El Director Científico del Simposio de Invierno de ICOI fue el Dr. Scott Ganz.

El Dr. Patel explicó un nuevo enfoque para el maxilar edéntulo, donde crear el espacio necesario para una prótesis fija de la arcada completa suele ser un reto.

“Por lo general, para este tipo de rehabilitación se usa una barra de titanio recubierta de acrílico, que requiere un espacio protésico de entre 15 y 20 milímetros”, explicó el Dr. Patel. “Ahora, con este nuevo producto de Glidewell Laboratories —el puente para arco completo BruxZir—, podemos reducir el espacio necesario a unos 10 milímetros. Además, este puente de zirconia no se rompe, astilla o mancha y tiene una buena estética blanca y rosada que es parte de la prótesis, en vez de estar una encima de otra”.

El producto, llamado BruxZir® Solid Zirconia Full-Arch Implant Prosthesis, es una una solución fija totalmente de zirconia para pacientes edéntulos con prótesis removibles que necesitan un reemplazo estable y estético.

El resultado de este nuevo producto de Glidewell, dijo el Dr. Patel, “es que ya no tenemos que preocuparnos de los dientes artificiales ni de que las áreas gingivales rosadas se pelen o cambien de color con el tiempo”.

Este tipo de restauración de zirconia sólida ofrece una excepcional resistencia a fracturas, astillas y las manchas del tiempo, y mejora la masticación y el habla. Además, el procedimiento clínico es casi idéntico al de la colocación de una prótesis híbrida implantosoportada.

“Llevamos haciendo puentes de arco completo durante dos años”, dijo Patel, “y restauraciones sólidas de zirconia desde hace un año. Es algo ue realmente ha mejorado nuestra práctica porque ahora no tenemos que preocuparse por ningún tipo de fractura o manchas en los dientes acrílicos, ni de esos antiestéticos agujeros de los tornillos que se observan cuando el compuesto y el acrílico no mezclan bien”.

La solución de arco completo BruxZir incluye una prótesis provisional CAD/CAM, que funciona como una dentadura temporal y permite evaluar la prótesis definitiva antes de fabricar la restauración final.

“A los pacientes les gusta saber que el acrílico no se va a manchar con el transcurso de tiempo”, explicó. Patel agregó que otra ventaja que los pacientes aprecian es saber “que tienen algo que no es tan frágil como el acrílico, ya que está hecho de óxido de zirconia, así que no se va a romper. Además de eso, Glidewell da una garantía de 7 años también en la prótesis”.

La empresa está tan convencida de la eficacia de la prótesis BruxZir que en su página web ofrece un protocolo clínico, paso a paso, que se puede realizar en 5 visitas del paciente.

Por otra parte, el Dr. Patel dijo que utiliza en sus prácticas de Carolina del Norte el sistema de implantes Hahn, que tienen conexión cónica. El experto describió el implante como “un producto de alta calidad que no tiene a un precio elevado”.

“Tiene un rosca muy pronunciada y una buena superficie, así como un cuello mecanizado de 1 milímetro en el cuello del implante, algo que ha demostrado ser muy compatible con el tejido giginval, tanto si la plataforma se posiciona equicrestal como subcrestal”, explicó Patel. “Esto permite que el hueso crezca encima y se comporte muy bien. Si tenemos una discrepancia supralingual del tejido, sabemos que el cuello mecanizado funciona mejor con el hueso y con los tejidos blandos”.

El Dr. Patel añadió que estaba muy satisfecho con los productos de Glidewell, ya que ofrecen soluciones de calidad a precios razonables. La empresa fabrica implantes y soluciones protésicas y está continuamente innovando para introducir nuevos productos en el mercado.

Recursos
Dr. Patel
Glidewell
ICOI
 

 

Brian Banton, vicepresidente de ventas internacionales de Glidewell Laboratories y otros directivos de la empresa en el stand en ICOI, con el Dr. Paresh Patel (derecha).

EAS paves way for future orthodontics

“The struggle we faced prior to the establishment of the EAS was that we did not have an independent forum to validate the claims of…

“The struggle we faced prior to the establishment of the EAS was that we did not have an independent forum to validate the claims of manufacturers. In addition, the foundation of such an independent body was essential from the consumer’s point of view. Patients needed an institution from which they could obtain independent advice,” Sharma told Dental Tribune Online in Vienna. “About two years ago, at our European advisory board meeting in Brussels, we therefore discussed the idea of launching an aligner society with the orthodontists who went on to become founding members of the EAS, including Dr Les Joffe, who was one of the first orthodontists to treat patients with Invisalign in the UK. We received an overall very good response from all parties involved.”

Align Technology, a market leader in aligner therapy, believed it important not to interfere with the establishment of the independent body. “In the launch of the society, it was not our job to influence but to bring in the right people—people who have been working successfully with aligners for a long time and therefore have considerable expertise in the field,” Sharma said.
 

Today, over 30 per cent of an estimated 2.6 million orthodontic cases a year worldwide are suitable for Invisalign treatment, but only 3–4 per cent of patients are actually treated with this clear aligner system. According to Sharma, this is soon to change through increasing awareness of the benefits of alternative treatment options among patients and dentists alike, as well as the rapidly growing importance of digital technologies.

“In the absence of knowledge, people take what they get. Through the work of the EAS, we want to ensure that patients know that they have a choice and do not have to accept metal braces. However, our efforts can only succeed if dentists believe that aligners are the right choice for the patient. Therefore, the primary aim of the society is to educate dentists on the system,” Sharma said. To this end, the EAS is targeting both orthodontists and general dentists.

“Moreover, orthodontics needs to keep pace with technological advancements,” he explained. “Brackets and wires have been used for orthodontic treatment for more than 150 years with hardly any adaptation to modern technology. We believe that patients should not be treated with technologies that are obsolete.”

That the first EAS congress attracted more than 300 participants from Europe, which is considered the most significant market for aligner treatment, as well as from Asia and the Middle East, reflects the importance of aligners in orthodontics today. “The congress surpassed our expectations. About five years ago, aligners were not widely accepted by orthodontists. They were rather considered an inferior plastic device. The attention the first EAS congress received shows the progress we have made in the past few years developing the system to treat more complex malocclusions and educating orthodontists about the potential it gives them to expand their clinical treatment portfolio. It really shows that aligners are becoming the new norm,” Sharma said.

“As a supporter of the society, we are facilitating the coming together to change the behaviour and mind set of dentists regarding orthodontics. This cannot be achieved by one company, only through the combined efforts of experienced clinicians and manufacturers. It is exciting to be a part of this,” he concluded.

Ritesh Sharma, Marketing Director at Align Technology, at the company's booth at the EAS congress in Vienna. (Photograph: Claudia Duschek, DTI)

February 14, 2016 11:00 pm
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Anatomical pin: A clinical case report

The use of an anatomical pin is proposed for the rehabilitation of anterior teeth with extensively compromised root canals and with significant loss of dentine…

The use of an anatomical pin is proposed for the rehabilitation of anterior teeth with extensively compromised root canals and with significant loss of dentine tissue. [3] In this restorative method, in addition to the fibreglass pin, a compound resin is used to model the radicular conduit with the objective of reducing the space that would be filled by the resin cement. In this way, the combination of two restorative materials (pin and compound resin) will serve and behave biomechanically as a replacement of the dentine structure lost. [4]

Anatomical pins have an extremely favourable prognosis in cases of fragile roots due to loss of dentine structure and they contribute significantly to the rehabilitation of the tooth in terms of both masticatory function and aesthetics. [5] In addition, the fibreglass pins have a more uniform distribution of tension in the occlusal and radicular regions compared with metal pins. [6] Etching and silanisation of the pins are of the utmost importance for pro moting interfacial adherence, especially in the region prepared for the core. [7,8]

This study reports on a clinical case that demonstrates the preparation technique for the anatomical pin, using fibreglass pins and compound resin, in a maxillary central incisor with weakened roots, with the objective of re-establishing the coronal portion of the tooth.

Case report

A young male patient came into the integrated dentistry clinic at Universidade Severino Sombra needing restorative treatment of tooth #21. In the clinical and radiographic examination, significant coronal destruction and satisfactory endodontic treatment were noted (Figs. 1–3).

Restoration with an anatomical pin was proposed to the patient, in order to recover the function and aesthetics of the tooth and provide for future rehabilitation of the tooth with a full ceramic crown.

First, the decayed tissue was removed from the remaining tooth structure and the fibreglass pin was selected (Exacto # 3, Angelus), as well as the accessory pins (Reforpin, Angelus; Fig. 4). The radicular conduit was isolated with mineral oil and the compound resin was applied (Fill Magic NT Premium, Vigodent/COLTENE) over the remaining tooth (Figs. 5 & 6) with the aid of a #1/2 Suprafill spatula (SS White). After filling of the conduit with resin, the Exacto pin and the pre-silanised accessory pins (Silano, Angelus) were inserted with the application of an adhesive (Fusion-Duralink, Angelus; Figs. 7–9). Next, the initial photoactivation was conducted on the pin and resin for 20 seconds.

Finally, the coronal reconstruction was performed with the previously used compound resin in incremental portions and photoactivation was conducted (Figs. 10 & 11). A marking was made on the most incisal portion of the pins to guide the subsequent cropping of the pins (Fig. 12). The anatomical pin was then removed and the final photoactivation was performed for 40 seconds (Fig. 13). Soon after, the pin was adapted to the remaining coronal structure (Fig. 14).

After the preparation phase of the anatomical pin and coronal portion of the core with compound resin, preparation for adhesive cementation to the remaining tooth began (Fig. 15). Acid etching of the pin was performed for 30 seconds, and then it was washed and dried. The silane was then applied (Silano) for 20 seconds, as well as the adhesive (Fusion-Duralink) with subsequent photoactivation for 20 seconds (Figs. 16–18).

After the anatomical pin had been prepared, acid etching was performed on the remaining tooth for 20 seconds, followed by washing and drying it lightly to leave the dentine moist (Fig. 19). The dentine primer and the adhesive (Fusion-Duralink system) were applied and then photoactivated for 20 seconds (Fig. 20).

The cementation was done with auto-polymerisable resin cement, waiting a period of five minutes for the cement to chemically set (Figs. 21 & 22). Once the cementation of the anatomical pin was finished, the adhesive was applied to the coronal portion and photoactivated for 20 seconds, and the compound resin was applied in incremental portions for creation of the core (Figs. 23 & 24).

In order to complete the restorative process, the prosthetic preparation of the core was performed for future seating of a full ceramic crown (Fig. 25).

Conclusion

The anatomical pin constituted a clinical alternative for coronal and radicular reconstruction of endodontically treated teeth with significant destruction of dentine. In addition to rehabilitating the tooth, this clinical approach promotes a more balanced distribution of masticatory forces without com – promising the remaining tooth structure, minimizing the risk of radicular fracture. Moreover, this restorative alternative provides the possibility of an aesthetic result with the use of a metal-free full crown.

Editorial note: A complete list of references is available from the publisher. This article was published in roots – international magazine of endodontology No. 01/2015.

(Photographs: Profs. Frederico dos Reis Goyatá & Orlando Izolani Neto, Brazil)

Soluciones implantológicas para arco completo en ICOI

El Dr. Patel, un reconocido experto en microimplantes, ofrecerá un taller titulado "Soluciones implantológicas para el arco completo: sobredentaduras o prótesis fija monolítica de zirconia"….

El Dr. Patel, un reconocido experto en microimplantes, ofrecerá un taller titulado "Soluciones implantológicas para el arco completo: sobredentaduras o prótesis fija monolítica de zirconia".

Fundador y miembro de la junta editorial del Journal of the International Academy of Mini Dental Implants, el Dr. Patel discutirá las últimas soluciones de implantes para la arcada completa, desde la sobredentadura básica a la prótesis monolítica de zirconia sobre implantes.

El especialista explorará las ventajas de cada opción restauradora, revisará sus protocolos de tratamiento, y explicará las consideraciones clínicas que intervienen en la determinación de la solución ideal para cada paciente. Este curso también incluye la oportunidad de una experiencia práctica con el sistema de implantes cónicos Hahn™. El curso está patrocinado por Glidewell Laboratories.

Para obtener más información sobre el Simposio de ICOI en Miami, visite www.icoi.org.
 

 

February 8, 2016 11:00 pm
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New interprofessional program links nursing and dentistry

The three-year interprofessional program at the Northeastern University’s School of Nursing and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine is being funded by a $1.2 million…

The three-year interprofessional program at the Northeastern University’s School of Nursing and the Harvard School of Dental Medicine is being funded by a $1.2 million cooperative agreement from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration. The program, called the Nurse Practitioner–Dentist Model for Primary Care, will bring Northeastern nurse practitioner students and Harvard dental students together in the Harvard Dental Center’s Teaching Practices clinic to provide both primary care and dental services to culturally diverse, medically underserved populations, and older adults in particular.

Under the new model, patients who come to the Harvard clinic for routine dental care will also have the opportunity to see a nurse practitioner for an annual wellness examination. If the nurse practitioner deems it necessary, he or she may refer patients to a primary care provider for follow-up.

According to the initiators of the project, the team approach is key for instilling best practices and improving them. The nursing and dental students will learn from one another by attending both disciplines’ clinical rotations, engaging in joint problem-solving, and negotiating to coordinate care.

“Through hands-on interactions, the students will come to understand the oral–systemic connection in a comprehensive and holistic way,” said Dr. Maria Dolce, associate professor at the School of Nursing. Oral diseases have been associated with a number of systemic conditions, such as pneumonia.

During the course of the program, Dolce and co-principal investigator Dr. John Da Silva, Associate Professor of Restorative Dentistry and Biomaterials Sciences and Vice Dean of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, will evaluate the model by analyzing patient health outcomes using detailed metrics, including data related to management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, both of which are linked to periodontal disease. Finally, they will develop a roadmap for the program for adoption by other nursing and dental schools.

“We have had a very siloed approach to health-professions education—nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and dentists are all trained separately,” Dolce said. “But with appropriate education, all health professionals, specifically non-dental health professionals, can promote oral health as a component of overall health and wellness.”

Dr. Maria Dolce from the Northeastern University’s School of Nursing has helped implement a new program to combine education for dental and primary health care professionals. (Photograph: Northeastern University)

January 24, 2016 11:00 pm
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Interview with Xavier Cherbavaz: “We strongly believe in education, we are committed to be more present in the region.”

DTMEA/CAPPmea: Dear Xavier, it is great to see you again during the 2nd MENA Symposium here in Dubai. Could you introduce yourself to those who…

DTMEA/CAPPmea: Dear Xavier, it is great to see you again during the 2nd MENA Symposium here in Dubai. Could you introduce yourself to those who don’t know you yet?
Xavier Cherbavaz: Of course, I am the Sales Director for France and Emerging Market, managing another golf from Russia up to India and going to Africa. We have different operation direct where we have more people and we use the network of dealers in some of the countries, like it is here like in Dubai for example.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: Could you tell us where is Ormco today?
Ormco is the largest company worldwide in orthodontics at this point, existing for over 50 years. At this moment the training of the professionals is the big part of Ormco mission. Also, most probably we are the company with the largest range of products, from the traditional to the twin brackets were you end wires toward the digital one were we deliver customized brackets with the right regulation and the wires that prevented so that the doctors spent time on adding value on the treatment plan and not spent lots of time in bandings. With this whole range we need to train our end user in order for them to be able to get to know the product.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: What is the main focus of todays’ Symposium?
Our main aim is to keep a relationship with the costumer we serve, through the product to the education so that’s why we are here at this 2nd MENA Symposium. Additionally, Insignia and DAMON are the main high end products of Ormco that we are presenting today during the Symposium in order for our users to expand their knowledge on those products.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: Do you spend lots of time with the end user?
Yes, we travel all the time to reach our costumer. We spend a lot of time with the end user. We are the innovating company, we try to launch new product, but also try to simplify the life of our client. Today, the training part is a big part behind so we try to spend as much time with them as possible in order to teach them about the new developments.

In the country where we are, orthodontics is a niche market, with limited number of people, they are all specialists. So generally there is in each country corresponding body where we know the orthodontists. Ormco is existing for over 50 years where we have relation where in almost each country someone has a product from us, which is a single spring or bracket or wires, maybe not all the range but some for sure. Orthodontics is a service industry so being close to the costumer is the top priority for us.

Our primary focus is to work with orthodontics, now in some countries there are also cases where GP’s are doing orthodontics, like let’s take Spain for example there is no orthodontists, there are mainly dentists. They don’t have a title of orthodontics because it doesn’t exist, in Italy, the specialization exists for only 4 years so for them is also something new so before there were mainly GP’s. We are working market by market, France is specialist market, people with strong specialty, scientific bodies so we work with them a lot. We are the company that adapts by markets.

DTMEA/CAPPmea: During last year’s Symposium you shared with us that there are aspirations on organizing education programs. How is this going on?
It is going very well at this point. Over the past four years, there were no courses in the region, only few. In 2014 we organized 25 courses we had close to 1500 people coming to our courses, orthodontists. This year we have organized 30 courses and we have 2400 and we organize that all across the countries from Qatar to Egypt to Lebanon. Our aim is to be as close to the costumer as possible, so we organize courses as much as we can to their offices. Here we have selected Dubai as it is convenient to come and this is Symposium.

DTMEA/CAPPmea:Do you already have plans for the next Symposium?
Yes, of course. Next year we will have another Symposium in India, it will be the first one, we had one in South Africa last year and this was also the first one. Traditionally, when we enter the market for the first time, we organize Symposium and then a range of courses with different speakers in order to adapt to local needs from basic level to the advanced.

We strongly believe in education, we are committed to be more present in the region. This is what we did in last three years and what we continue to do. Ormco is the largest company worldwide so we have almost every philosophy of product to serve the orthodontics.

Xavier Cherbavaz, Director for France and Emerging Markets, Ormco

February 22, 2016 11:00 pm
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Curso Intensivo de Láser Aplicado a Odontología Moderna

CIAEO es un instituto de formación dirigido por reconocidos especialistas de talla internacional, como son los doctores Edgar Güiza, Patricia Vargas, Edgar García Hurtado y…

CIAEO es un instituto de formación dirigido por reconocidos especialistas de talla internacional, como son los doctores Edgar Güiza, Patricia Vargas, Edgar García Hurtado y Jairo Quintana.

El curso está dirigido a los odontólogos interesados en la salud bucal y en los tratamientos dentales que incluyen estética, blanqueamiento y terapias de tejidos blandos, entre otros, donde el láser puede ser aplicado en beneficio del paciente con resultados efectivos a corto plazo.

El objetivo del mismo demostrará el uso y aplicabilidad del láser en la práctica privada diaria.

Se trata de un curso intensivo de 8 horas en el que el odontólogo aprenderá a los fundamentos, protocolos y técnicas de los diferentes tipos de láser aplicados en la odontología moderna.

Durante el curso los participantes realizarán prácticas en pacientes con los diferentes láseres, donde experimentarán esta gran tecnología, al igual que su efectividad y ventajas para su práctica privada.

El curso tratará temas como Fundamentos de Láser, Indicaciones y contraindicaciones de uso o Protocolo para cada tipo de tejido, además de la Práctica clínica en pacientes.

Los participantes recibirán un Certificado de Altos estudios otorgado por CIAEO.

Por otra parte, CIAEO anunció también un Curso de Fotografía Profesional para documentar casos clínicos y de laboratorio, al igual que para la planeación y manejo de técnicas con cerámica rosada.

Este curso tendrá lugar el 11 y 12 de marzo en Bogotá y el cupo es limitado.

Pida el Código de Descuento DT2016.

Recursos
CIAEO
 

 

El curso de CIAEO permite aprender a manejar con confianza el láser.

February 1, 2016 11:00 pm
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AO’s young clinicians mingle at Café Sevilla

Dr. Tabitha Chen from San Francisco shared a sentiment expressed by a number of other clinicians. “It’s hard because when you are in private practice,…

Dr. Tabitha Chen from San Francisco shared a sentiment expressed by a number of other clinicians. “It’s hard because when you are in private practice, which I am, it feels very isolating,” she said. “You don’t get to talk to your peers. At a function like this, you can talk to people that graduated around the same time who are going through the same thing as you … trying to get their feet wet and trying to establish themselves in the community.”

“It’s very comforting to know you are in the same type of situation as a lot of other people,” Chen said.

Dr. Nathan O’Connor is a young clinician from Yakima, Wash., who said he came to the meeting to improve his diagnostic and treatment skills, adding that the global emphasis has helped him mature as a clinician by providing different points of view.

“I liked the presentation by Dr. Frank Spears. You get a sense for times when you do treat with implants, and times when you don’t. You get a broad perspective in an organization that draws people from all over the world,” said O’Connor.

Dr. Brian Lee from Irvine, Calif., agrees that the AO and the YCC provide him a broader look at the developments in the science that he wasn’t aware of in his practice.

“Sometimes in your practice, you are so focused on what you have been doing that you don’t know where the field is headed in general. Coming here gives you a kind of broad overview perspective that you can take back with you,” said Lee.

Resident Hebe Cevera-Gonzales from Mexico City is here to support friends who are presenting E-Posters. She is enthusiastic about the AO meeting and how it has helped her expand her skills and feel more comfortable.

The YCC includes young professionals who are newer members of AO. Many members are involved in both research and academia in addition to being practicing clinicians.

“The YCC facilitates the exchange of ideas from the future of the AO’s membership,” said Brownfield. “It is important to keep the Academy going.”

The committee was established in 2010 to bring together the knowledge of experienced clinicians and the enthusiasm of young members to raise awareness of the Academy and promote research and education. To learn more about becoming a member of the YCC, email academy@osseo.org.

(Source: Academy of Osseointegration)

 

The Young Clinicians Committee hosted a reception at Café Sevilla during the Academy of Osseointegration’s 31st Annual Meeting in San Diego. (Photo: Academy of Osseointegration)

February 19, 2016 7:52 pm
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TRIOS scans most accurate and consistent

The study, which was conducted jointly by the University of Maryland in Baltimore and the University of Freiburg in Germany, aimed to compare the ability…

The study, which was conducted jointly by the University of Maryland in Baltimore and the University of Freiburg in Germany, aimed to compare the ability of intra-oral scanning systems of different brands to accurately scan a single molar abutment tooth in vitro. The analyses included the following six scanners: iTero (Align Technology), 3M True Definition (3M ESPE), PlanScan (Planmeca), CS 3500 (Carestream Dental), TRIOS and CEREC AC Omnicam (Sirona Dental Systems).

In order to compare the accuracy of each system, the investigators used an industrial-grade, highly accurate reference scanner to create a digital reference dataset for an acrylic dental model. A single trained, experienced dentist then scanned the acrylic model on three separate occasions using each of the six intra-oral scanning systems.

Trueness (accuracy) was defined by superimposing the three digital datasets over the reference dataset, with 3-D comparisons then performed. Precision (consistency) was defined by superimposing each dataset over the other two datasets obtained and then evaluating for 3-D deviations.

Of the 18 datasets analysed, the smallest deviations for the trueness measurements (± standard deviation) between the reference dataset and the various intra-oral scanner datasets were obtained from TRIOS (6.9 ± 0.9 µm), followed by CS 3500 (9.8 ± 0.8 µm), iTero (9.8 ± 2.5 µm), 3M True Definition (10.3 ± 0.9 µm), PlanScan (30.9 ± 10.8 µm) and CEREC AC Omnicam (45.2 ± 17.1 µm).

As for precision values, here too 3Shape’s TRIOS was identified as the most accurate (4.5 ± 0.9 µm), followed by 3M True Definition (6.1 ± 1.0 µm), iTero (7.0 ± 1.4 µm), CS 3500 (7.2 ± 1.7 µm), CEREC AC Omnicam (16.2 ± 4.0 µm), and PlanScan (26.4 ± 5.0 µm).

“The TRIOS scanning technology, in combination with the wand design, seems to be beneficial for capturing high quality datasets with excellent trueness and precision values,” the investigators said.

However, the results obtained do not provide any information about the quality of a fabricated restoration based on these digital datasets, the researchers stressed. Moreover, in an in vivo design, the outcomes might be different owing to the presence of blood, saliva, and patient movements, they concluded.

The study, titled “Evaluation of the accuracy of six intraoral scanning devices: An in-vitro investigation”, was published in Volume 10, Issue 4, of the ADA Professional Product Review.

3Shape’s intra-oral scanner TRIOS delivered the most accurate results when compared with other leading scanning systems in a recent study. (Photograph: 3Shape)

February 14, 2016 11:00 pm
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Hospitals’ waste poses serious health hazards

Confirming that sanitary staff have developed the habit of dumping unsafe waste of Sindh Services Hospital, Karachi, outside its main gate on M A Jinnah…

Confirming that sanitary staff have developed the habit of dumping unsafe waste of Sindh Services Hospital, Karachi, outside its main gate on M A Jinnah Road, an official of the hospital said that the hospital’s waste which include used disposable syringes, drips, urine or blood bags, needles, fluids, etc, was posing serious health hazards to visiting patients, besides creating an stinking atmosphere in and around the health facility.

“As if it was not enough to pollute the environment, sanitary workers of Karachi Municipal Corporation are also dumping garbage of the nearby Allahwala Marketin front of the hospital’s main gate,” the official remarked.

Similarly, during a visit to KMC’s Sobhraj Maternity Hospital, located near Urdu Bazaar, one could see garbage often remain littered all around it. People visiting the hospital and those living in its vicinity are the worst sufferers as the sanitary staff had abandoned its previous practice of disposing of garbage daily at their designated sites.

Complaining about the filthy environment prevailing in the surrounding of Sobhraj Maternity Hospital, a patient visiting the health facility’s OPD said that it seems as if the officials of Sindh and KMC health department and EnvironmentalProtection Agency are least bothered about such dangerous trends.

The Sindh Services Hospital’s medical superintendent Dr Khalid Shaikh, when contacted, said that the hospital administration has brought the issue into the notice of secretary local government with a request to direct the concerned department to ensure lifting of garbage on regular basis.

File Photo

January 14, 2016 11:00 pm
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Together towards pink-white esthetics

Consistent close cooperation between the dentist and the dental technician and their concerted action provided the basis for a successful outcome. Case presentation A 32-year-old…

Consistent close cooperation between the dentist and the dental technician and their concerted action provided the basis for a successful outcome.

Case presentation
A 32-year-old female patient presented to our practice with an unsightly, defective anterior bridge extending from tooth 12 to tooth 21. The bridge had been placed seven years ago. As she was unsatisfied with her smile, the patient was looking for an esthetic, more natural-looking alternative. The veneer of the metal-ceramic bridge had a very opaque and yellowish appearance. In tooth 21, the metal margin was exposed cervically due to gingival recession. Alveolar ridge atrophy in the area of the missing right central incisor (pontic) had resulted in a considerable vertical reduction. The shape and shade of the teeth needed improvement and harmony between white and pink tissues had to be restored (Fig. 1).

Treatment plan and mock- up
Since smile improvements involve complex procedures, it is advisable to simulate the final result by means of a direct com posite mock-up. This important step enhances the trust and confidence of the patient.
A mock-up provides the patient with a clear idea of what the effect of the planned restoration will be once it has been seated in the mouth. In our opinion, this step cannot be entirely replaced by digital design previews. The mock-up allows the lab technician to obtain a better understanding of the individual clinical situation. Later on, the mock-up can be used as a template in the fabrication of the lab wax-up and/or the provisional restoration.
In the case at hand, the mock-up revealed that in order to achieve a more balanced appearance, tooth 22 needed to be integrated into the restoration (Fig. 2). And even more importantly: it showed that not only the correct position, shape and colour of the teeth were key factors in achieving a harmonious smile in this case, but also the correct gingival architecture and emergence profiles. Consequently, the patient was informed that, in order to achieve a satisfactory result, the soft tissue volume had to be increased in the pontic area. The patient fully agreed to the treatment plan suggested.

The treatment plan involved:
1. the removal of the existing restoration
2. the placement of a provisional bridge and soft tissue grafting in the pontic area (soft tissue management that would take several months)
3. the insertion of a new ceramic bridge and a laminate veneer on tooth 22 and, if needed, also on tooth 13

Connective tissue graft and immediate provisional bridge Very frequently, tooth extraction can be established as the possible cause of alveolar ridge atrophy. In this particular case, there was a considerable lack of volume due to bone loss in the pontic area. To re-establish the soft-tissue architecture, two surgical interventions were planned. Immediately after having performed the first connective tissue graft, a provisional, lab-fabricated bridge was placed. The bridge was constructed on the basis of the mock-up information. It was reinforced with metal wire. The soft tissue contouring phase that followed took several months. Initially, the provisional exhibited an inner concave surface to provide sufficient space for the soft tissue. Some authors suggest that the provisional pontic should have the final convex shape. However, having a concave initial shape allows for progressive tissue modelling from the palatal to the buccal side, which is helpful especially when several grafts are needed (Figs. 3a to 6d).
Communication of emergence profiles and shapes to the lab Once the desired soft tissue shape has been achieved, one of the great challenges is to transmit all the relevant information, especially the length of the inter-incisal papillae and the pontic shape, to the dental lab. This is important because when the impression is made, the pressure of the impression material may deform the soft tissue. In order to prevent any possible loss of information, the pontic area of the provisional restoration was filled with a silicone-based impression material and then placed over the prepared teeth on the model (Figs. 7 and 8). This would provide the technician with a good approximation of the final shape of the pontic.

In order to determine the correct location of the contact point, the distance between the bone crest and the gingival crest was measured. It is well-established in the literature that a papilla will be present if the contact point is no more than 6.5 mm away from the most coronal interproximal height of the bone crest between a natural tooth and a pontic. This can be measured by probing the bone with an endodontic spreader, marking the distance during the ceramic try-in and then using it in the fabrication of the restoration. However, using this distance can lead to a very large contact area with a short papilla if the bone is missing. The result is an unnatural, square tooth shape. Therefore, this is important information for the dental technician. When applied wisely during ceramic layering, interproximal pink, brown and yellow stains can create a very natural illusion and thus help to overcome this problem. In the course of the treatment in this case, it became clear that the restoration of tooth 13 was unnecessary to achieve the desired outcome.

The try-in of the restoration revealed that the zeniths of the gingival contours were misplaced. The use of slide share software (e.g. Keynote) allowed us to transmit visual information to the dental technician on the following issues:
– the desired gingival zenith
– the desired interproximal stains (to mask the interproximal spaces) – the position of the buccal ridges, which is of paramount importance for the visual perception (Fig. 9)

Final restorations
Even though cementing the veneers first has certain advantages colour stabilization), in this particular case both types of restorations were cemented simultaneously. The veneer for tooth 22 was pressed from IPS e.max® Press lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (shade LT, A2) and completed with IPS e.max Ceram. The pressable ceramic is available in various degrees of opacity and enables esthetic restorations to be fabricated that blend seamlessly with the remaining dentition. Variolink® Esthetic LC, a light-curing luting composite (in a neutral shade), was used to cement the laminate veneer (Figs 10 to 13). The porcelain-fused-to-zirconia bridge (IPS e.max ZirCAD veneered with IPS e.max Ceram) was cemented with the self-adhesive, self-curing resin cement SpeedCEM® (in shade Transparent) according to the instructions of the manufacturer.

Conclusion
Smile improvements are very challenging, particularly if, in addition to restoring the white esthetics, a harmonization of the gingival architecture is required. Only by choosing a multidisciplinary treatment approach will be mutually beneficial communication between the dentist and dental technician. This is an essential prerequisite to achieve the desired success.

February 16, 2016 11:00 pm
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Un sofisticado servicio de relaciones públicas para la industria dental

El servicio permite ahora a empresas y fabricantes dentales promover fácilmente sus productos mediante contenido editorial individualizado, medios sociales y digitales, eventos y videos. Estos…

El servicio permite ahora a empresas y fabricantes dentales promover fácilmente sus productos mediante contenido editorial individualizado, medios sociales y digitales, eventos y videos. Estos servicios combinan una alta calidad editorial, dirigida a una audiencia muy específica y la mejor cobertura en odontología, basada en la alta reputación internacional de Dental Tribune.

DTI Communication Services responde a la necesidad de un número creciente de empresas dentales que necesitan ofrecer contenidos atractivos para iniciar, mantener y fortalecer el diálogo con sus grupos objetivo. Las pequeñas y medianas empresas, que cuentan con limitados recursos de marketing, trabajan con proveedores de servicios para crear contenido, pero estos proveedores no puede garantizar una alta circulación y penetración en los medios impresos y online de la industria dental.

DTI Communication Services ofrece una solución universal, que abarca desde la creación de contenidos a la distribución de contenidos a la mayor red del mundo de dentistas, técnicos dentales, distribuidores y fabricantes.

A continuación, un sumario de lo que ofrece DTI Communication Services:

• Servicio Editorial: DTI Communication Services trabaja en estrecha colaboración con el cliente para crear contenido editorial único, como artículos noticiosos, comunicados de prensa y entrevistas, así como promociones previas y posteriores a eventos. El servicio garantiza la distribución del contenido a una red de 650.000 dentistas en todo el mundo. Los clientes pueden elegir ediciones impresas o en línea, además de los canales de medios sociales de DTI. Todos los artículos se publican como contenido patrocinado, parte de la política de transparencia de DTI con respecto al lector.

• Medios sociales y digitales: Muchas compañías dentales usan Facebook, YouTube o Twitter para interactuar con sus clientes, pero ¿qué canal se adapta mejor a las necesidades de la empresa? Nuestra gama de medios sociales y digitales incluye consultoría en comunicación social, seguimiento y publicidad, así como diseño de páginas web complejas. Además, DTI Communication Services analiza la página web de la compañía respecto a gramática, ortografía y palabras clave con objeto de presentar una avanzada página actualizada para la era digital.

• Organización y promoción de eventos: Los eventos son la oportunidad perfecta para mantener relaciones con clientes y medios de comunicación. DTI Communication Services organiza y presenta discusiones, conferencias de prensa y mesas redondas para nuestros clientes durante ferias, congresos y eventos de empresa, un servicio que abarca desde el desarrollo de la idea a su ejecución, y que incluye la promoción pre y post evento.

Otros servicios incluyen la producción de vídeo (vídeos corporativos, educativos y de productos), optimización de motores de búsqueda, así como diseño de páginas webs y apps. Si desea más información o tarifas de servicios, contacte con el equipo de DTI Communication Services.

Recursos
Tarifas
Información
 

 

DTI Publishing Group ofrece ahora también un sofisticado servicio de relaciones públicas para empresas dentales (Foto: Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock).

Dental & Implant Seminars, educación profesional de alta calidad

¿Cuál es la misión de Dental & Implant Seminars? La misión es muy clara: ofrecer al odontólogo, ya sea de práctica general o especialista, una…

¿Cuál es la misión de Dental & Implant Seminars?
La misión es muy clara: ofrecer al odontólogo, ya sea de práctica general o especialista, una alternativa en educación continua donde la mayoría de los programas que se ofrecen son de corta duración muy puntuales y bien fundamentados sobre diversas técnicas vanguardistas, específicamente odontología restaurativa e implantología oral. La idea es poner al alcance del odontólogo una oferta de calidad que anteriormente sólo se tenía acudiendo a otros países.

¿Podría describir el primer curso de implantología?
Generó la expectativa y el nerviosismo del principio de cualquier proyecto en cualquier ámbito de la vida. Pero fue muy especial, ya que fue el comienzo de un proyecto en el que se lleva trabajando bastante tiempo, desde el desarrollo de las temáticas y contenidos de los diferentes cursos, pasando por los aspectos logísticos, que van desde el diseño de las instalaciones hasta el afinamiento de los detalles que podrían parecer menos importantes. Todo esto junto al ambiente que se generó entre los dictantes y los asistentes, además del vínculo que se fortaleció con la casa comercial patrocinadora, que en esta oportunidad fue la compañía española Phibo, hizo de este acontecimiento un evento muy especial y de mucho aprendizaje.

¿Cuántos alumnos participaron y cuál ha sido la respuesta?
La participación fue de 15 alumnos, ya que la idea es que los programas sean personalizados para poder brindar toda la atención al asistente y que siempre se sienta apoyado por parte del docente o docentes que van a impartir los cursos. Y la respuesta fue muy gratificante ya que estuvieron muy pendientes de las clases y en algunos casos incluso se apuntaron a los demás cursos que ya se tienen agendados. Esto nos hace pensar que vamos por muy buen camino.

¿En qué se diferencia de otras instituciones de formación profesional?
La diferencia es muy clara: nosotros como centro de entrenamiento no pretendemos competir con las universidades, ya que son misiones totalmente diferentes. Nuestro objetivo es muy claro: más que formar, se trata de depurar al profesional porque pensamos que la formación y la generación de conocimiento es una función irremplazable de las universidades: una especialidad nunca va a estar por debajo de un curso. Lo que nosotros pretendemos es depurar al profesional en técnicas muy puntuales en los diferentes ámbitos de la odontología restauradora y de la implantología oral.

¿Tienen un énfasis en prácticas sobre pacientes?
Algunos cursos son teórico-práctico-demostrativos y algunos teórico-prácticos-clínicos, en los cuales el asistente tiene la oportunidad de poner en práctica las diferentes técnicas que se dictan en el curso, pero siempre de la mano del responsable del mismo. Esa es otra de las razones por las cuales se determinó que sea un reducido número de asistentes y que éstos sean odontólogos ya titulados.

¿Quiénes forman parte del grupo académico de profesores?
Contamos con un consejo académico responsable de seleccionar los cursos, dependiendo de las necesidades del gremio, y revisar los contenidos de los mismos. Los profesores que ya están confirmados para este año son: Dr. Mario H. Rodríguez Tizcareño (México), Dr. Julio César Corona (Venezuela), Dra. Lorena Contreras (México), Dr. Milko Villarroel (Brasil), Dr. Scott Ganz (EUA), Dr. Francisco Teixeira (España), Dr. Ramón Asencio (España), Dr. Teddy Romero (España), Dr. Arturo Hernández (México), Dr. Armando Badet (España), Dr. Sergio Cacciacane (Argentina), entre otros.

¿Cuáles son los beneficios para los alumnos?
Contenidos muy balanceados en cuanto a teoría y práctica, grupos reducidos, profesores de alto nivel que son líderes de opinión en sus diferentes áreas y países y, sobre todo, un profundo compromiso de que el asistente salga totalmente satisfecho y capacitado para realizar y aplicar las diferentes técnicas aprendidas en los diferentes programas que ofrece el instituto.

¿Cuál es el programa de cursos para 2016?
Hasta ahora tenemos confirmados los siguientes programas:

“Curso Quirúrgico de Implantología Oral”
Dr. Mario H. Rodríguez Tizcareño, Dr. Julio C. Corona Rodríguez, Dra. Lorena Contreras Álvarez
Marzo 2016
Teórico-Práctico-Clínico

“Soluciones Cerámicas en Rehabilitación: de lo simple a lo complejo en dientes e implantes”
Dr. Milko Villarroel
26, 27 y 28 de Mayo de 2016
Hands On

“Principios y Aplicación de Regeneración Ósea”
Dr. Julio C. Corona Rodríguez, Dra. Lorena Contreras Álvarez
Mayo 2016
Teórico-Práctico-Clínico

“Elevación de Seno Maxilar”
Dr. Scott D. Ganz
Teórico-Práctico-Clínico
Fecha por confirmar

“Manejo de Ácido Hialurónico en Odontología”
Dr. Edgar Teddy Romero Peláez
Teórico-Práctico-Clínico
Fecha por confirmar

“Curso de Estética en Implantología”
Dr. Francisco Teixeira Barbosa, Dr. Ramón Asensio
Teórico-Práctico-Demostrativo
Fecha por confirmar

“Curso de Fotografía Dental”
Dr. Arturo Hernández López
Mayo 2016

“Oclusión y Disfunción”
Dr. Armando Badet
Teórico-Práctico-Demostrativo
Fecha por confirmar

“Procedimientos de carga y Provisionalización Inmediata en Implantología”
Dr. Mario H. Rodríguez Tizcareño
Teórico-Práctico-Demostrativo
Fecha por confirmar

“Manejo de programas informáticos para la interpretación tomográfica y su aplicación para la implementación de cirugía guiada en Implantología”
Sr. Salvador Gómez Crespo, Dr. Mario H. Rodríguez Tizcareño
Teórico-Práctico-Demostrativo
Fecha por confirmar

¿Qué tipo de certificación o diploma ofrecen?
Se ofrecen certificados de horas crédito de diferentes instituciones que tienen la potestad de otorgar valor curricular, dependiendo del tipo de programa que se imparta.

¿Con qué instituciones está asociado Dental & Implant Seminars?
Más que asociados, existen vínculos con las diferentes universidades en las cuales la mayoría de los profesores de los cursos forman parte de sus cuerpos docentes, además de tener vínculos cercanos con asociaciones internacionales de mucho peso académico y evidentemente con las diferentes casas comerciales líderes en el ramo y con amplia presencia en México.

Los interesados en los cursos pueden obtener un descuento utilizando el Código de Promoción DT2016. Si desea más información, consulte la página de Facebook Dental-Implant-Seminars o comuníquese con la Dra. Diana Beltrán por teléfono o e-mail: Telefonos +52 (55) 7024-5728; +52 (55) 5524-9515; + 52 (0) 44 55 1193-9403. E-mail: d.i.seminars@hotmail.com

La Dra. Magnolia Moreno Cervantes, directora del avanzado centro de educación en implantología y rehabilitación Dental & Implant Seminars, en Ciudad de México.

February 21, 2016 11:00 pm
Open news on http://www.dental-tribune.com

Un libro sobre la historia de la Escuela de Odontología de Puerto Rico

El Dr. Suárez manifestó durante el congreso, organizado por el Colegio de Cirujanos Dentistas de Puerto Rico (CCDPR) del 18 al 20 de febrero pasado,…

El Dr. Suárez manifestó durante el congreso, organizado por el Colegio de Cirujanos Dentistas de Puerto Rico (CCDPR) del 18 al 20 de febrero pasado, que se trata “de una obra impulsada por la anterior decana, Dra. Yilda M. Rivera, que en ocasión de celebrar el 50 aniversario de la escuela en 2007, designó a un grupo de trabajo con la encomienda de preparar un libro sobre la historia de la institución”.

La investigación necesaria para el libro llevó considerable tiempo debido al volumen de información que hubo que recopilar para la obra. “Fueron cuatro años de trabajo intensivo y recién hace dos días la Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto Rico publicó la primera tirada del texto, que ahora estamos presentando en el Congreso Dental del Caribe”, explicó.

El libro relata los pormenores desde el inicio de la institución hasta el momento actual, todo detalladamente documentado, y refleja también cómo la escuela ha contribuido a mejorar a la salud oral y a la sociedad puertorriqueña en general.

“Este libro es un legado para los integrantes actuales de la profesión y para los que vengan después, que describe los orígenes y los valores de la institución y, sobre todo, cómo preservarlos”, manifestó el Dr. Suárez.

El autor y odontólogo dijo que la Escuela de Odontología de UPR, inaugurada en 1957, es una institución acreditada por la Asociación Dental Americana (ADA), que nunca ha perdido su acreditación, donde los estudiantes reciben educación bilingue.

“Esto quiere decir que nos hemos mantenido a la vanguardia de la educación dental en su desarrollo continuo”, agregó. “Al presente, podemos decir con orgullo que de la escuela han egresado 2,500 odontólogos, que no sólo ejercen en Puerto Rico sino también en Estados Unidos”.

Además de odontología general, la Escuela de Odontología de UPR cuenta con todo tipo especialidades.

Otro de los aspectos relevantes de la Escuela es su Centro de Investigación, “cuyo énfasis es atender las desigualdades en salud oral de la población, donde los hispanos o los pobres están en desventaja. Este centro ha contribuido grandemente a reducir estas desigualdades”, concluyó el Dr. Suárez.

El libro se puede adquirir a través de la Editorial de la Universidad de Puerto Rico y Amazon.

Recursos
UPR
CCDPR
 

 

El Dr. Carlos L. Suárez, autor del libro sobre la historia de la Escuela de Odontología de la Universidad de Puerto Rico (Foto: José Antonio Rosario).

Straumann acquires stake in Anthogyr, Overtakes China business

The agreement, according to both parties, is to become effective by the end of March this year. Financial details of the deal were not disclosed….

The agreement, according to both parties, is to become effective by the end of March this year. Financial details of the deal were not disclosed.

Straumann said in a press release that the sales capabilities of the two companies are expected to provide the critical mass to compete and grow successfully in the premium segment, where they have already been active for a number of years.

In an effort to extend its leading market position, Straumann recently established a new country organisation and distributor network that is intended to cover all of the provinces of China. Anthogyr’s dental implant system has been registered in and is established in China, where it is positioned as a high-quality, attractively priced option, according to the company.

The medical device market in China is dominated by international premium companies. (Photograph: KPG Ivary/Shutterstock)

Las coronas son superiores a los empastes

Los resultados indican también que la técnica Hall causa menor incomodidad y problemas para los pacientes que otros métodos de empaste. Esta técnica, que lleva…

Los resultados indican también que la técnica Hall causa menor incomodidad y problemas para los pacientes que otros métodos de empaste.

Esta técnica, que lleva el nombre del dentista escocés que la desarrolló, usa una corona metálica preformada que se coloca sobre el diente sin anestesia local, eliminación de tejido cariado o preparación del diente. Presentada por primera vez hace una década, fla técnica fue desarrollado originalmente como un tratamiento no invasivo para molares primarios cariados.

Los investigadores analizaron en esta nueva revisión los resultados clínicos de varios estudios que comparaban empastes con coronas realizados siguiendo métodos convencionales o la técnica Hall. También incluyeron estudios que comparaban coronas preformadas con tratamiento no restaurador de la caries, así como coronas metálicas preformadas con coronas blancas preformadas.

Si bien la revisión no encontró evidencia de la superioridad de un tipo corona sobre otra, los resultados indican que los dientes restaurados con coronas preformadas son menos propensos a desarrollar problemas o causar dolor en comparación con los empastes.

"Las coronas se recomiendan para restaurar molares primarios que han recibido tratamiento pulpar, están muy decaídos o rotos. Sin embargo, son pocos los odontólogos que las utilizan en la práctica clínica", manifestaron los investigadores.

El objeto inicial de la revisión fue tratar de determinar si la evolución clínica de los dientes primarios restaurados con coronas preformadas o con empastes estaba de ninguna manera relacionada con el alcance de su decadencia.

La revisión actualiza una versión anterior sobre este tópico, publicada originalmente por el grupo en 2007.
 

 

Corona metálica preformada colocada siguiendo la técnica de Hall (Foto: Cortesía del Dr. Iyad Hussein, Emiratos Árabes Unidos).

February 3, 2016 11:00 pm
Open news on http://www.dental-tribune.com

BIOLASE opens new center for dental laser continuing education

The BIOLASE Learning Center houses a main lecture hall that can seat more than 50 participants, a fully equipped hands-on laser laboratory featuring the company’s…

The BIOLASE Learning Center houses a main lecture hall that can seat more than 50 participants, a fully equipped hands-on laser laboratory featuring the company’s latest laser solutions, as well as group meeting rooms, a business center for guests, and a café.

The laboratory features a WaterLase iPlus all-tissue laser and EPIC X diode laser at each station, along with the capability for live video demonstrations with the built-in monitors at each station.

“A key part of our go-forward strategy in the transformation of BIOLASE is to offer in-depth training and support for our customers to ensure they fully understand how our systems can improve patient outcomes and help them achieve their patient and business goals,” said BIOLASE President and CEO Harold C. Flynn, Jr. “Our new learning center creates an environment that supports the educational needs of the dental community, by developing high-valued educational offerings that promote life-long learning and provides our customers with the tools and skills to provide better dentistry for their patients.”

The company announced that more than 20 laser courses are planned to take place at the BIOLASE Learning Center this year.

Dr. Samuel B. Low, a leading periodontist, instructs dentists in one of the new hands-on laboratory at the BIOLASE Learning Center. (Photograph: Business Wire)

February 29, 2016 11:00 pm
Open news on http://www.dental-tribune.com

PMMA para la era digital

Idodentine CAD/CAM Solutions de Unidesa-odi, es una solución para la confección de prótesis dentales mediante fresadoras CAD/CAM. Fabricado a partir de una resina acrílica Rr-HCL-PMMA,…

Idodentine CAD/CAM Solutions de Unidesa-odi, es una solución para la confección de prótesis dentales mediante fresadoras CAD/CAM. Fabricado a partir de una resina acrílica Rr-HCL-PMMA, polimetacrilato de metilo de alto peso molecular, fuertemente reticulado y reforzado, muy similar a la utilizada en la fabricación de los dientes artificiales. Este material posee gran dureza y una fuerte resistencia a la abrasión, además sus pigmentos minerales garantizan sus estabilidad cromática, permitiendo crear prótesis provisionales de altísima calidad y larga duración.

“Idodentine CAD/CAM posee una gran estabilidad, es muy fácil de fresar y su coloración inalterable le hace idóneo para rehabilitaciones removibles de larga duración. Tanto sobre implantes como móvil el resultado es perfecto”, explica Sergio Dominguez, International Marketing Manager de Unidesa-odi (Unión Dental). Idodentine CAD/CAM está disponible para los sistemas CAD/CAM más punteros en disco: Regular (98,5mm), Zirkonzahn® (98,5mm), Ceramill® (98,5mm) y bloques: Cerec® (15,5mm/19mm/39mm) y Roland® (20mm/40mm/76mm). Este año Unidesa-odi presenta en Expodental’16 sus nuevas soluciones CAD/CAM.